ROBOPAL: Build STEM Skills. Build Robots. Have Fun.

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A hands-on learning robot and maker system that expands your child’s interest in coding, programming and creating in a fun way.

‘ROBOPAL’ is a fun, interactive way to learn coding and programming. It features 3 types of magnetic coding blocks — action, logic, and function— to create commands for the robot. The company claims kids can learn if-then logic, sequential logic, and problem solving skills. ‘ROBOPAL’ comes with 10 USB ports to add additional sensors like lights and fans.

Continue onto Mashable to watch this robot in action.

Student Recycles to Save Money for College

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Ryan Hickman earning the funds through his business, Ryan’s Recycling

Eight-year-old Ryan Hickman is an entrepreneur with a strong personality and a passion for recycling. He’s got years of experience, too—he’s been in the business since he was just three years old! To date, Hickman has saved more than $33,000 for his college education. Through his business, Ryan’s Recycling, Hickman has recycled an estimated 265,000 bottles and cans.

Every week for years, he and his family have sorted through bags of recyclables. As of mid-December 2016, he had earned $10K by recycling cans and bottles from his customers—friends, family, and neighbors. Once he reached that milestone, the mainstream media began to take notice. After first being mentioned on a website called One Green Planet, the story behind Ryan’s Recycling went viral. Since then, Ryan’s story has been seen by over 140 million people on social media channels.

Hickman has since been featured on just about every major news station in the United States and several around the world. He appeared on The Ellen DeGeneres Show, where he was presented with a check for $10,000, as well as a battery-operated vehicle to use in his work. His story has run in various newspapers, including USA TODAY and the Orange County Register, as well as on ABC World News and other social and mainstream media sites.

His father Damion says Ryan got started recycling when he took him along to a local rePlanet, the largest recycling collection network in the country. At just 3-1/2 years old, Damion says Ryan “really enjoyed going, and I gave him the money from the plastic bottles.” He says it didn’t take long for Ryan to connect the dots: recycled bottles and cans = money. “He asked all our neighbors to start saving for him. He then enlisted people in his grandparents’ neighborhood, and it just grew from there.”

Hickman has regular customers that call every month for a local pickup, and friends and family drop off regularly. Every three weeks, his biggest customer, El Niguel Country Club, fills up the family truck with cans and bottles. Ryan and his dad take it all home and begin sorting the glass, plastic and aluminum cans. “Everything is bagged up, and then we head off to the recycle center,” says Damion. “A typical trip for us takes about an hour, and Ryan usually makes around $200+ each trip.”

Damion reports that Ryan is involved in every step of his business, from collecting the cans and bottles from his customers to picking up the bags and gloves to do the work. “He even handles depositing his money in the bank, where they all know him as Ryan, the president of Ryan’s Recycling.” Early last year, Hickman sold T-shirts to friends, family, and customers and donated the profits to the Pacific Marine Mammal Center in Laguna Beach, California, where he serves as a junior ambassador. Ryan has donated over $5000 to their efforts.

Ryan continues to recycle and educate others through interview appearances. His father reports that he’s recently begun preparing his parents for the day that he’ll need to buy himself a real trash truck.

“I’m not sure where he plans to park it,” says Damion, “but I have a feeling I would lose my spot in the driveway!”

Ryan has received thousands of emails around the world with people that have been inspired to start recycling after seeing his story.

Recently Ryan started a new ten week recycling campaign to try to get everyone around the world involved with recycling 300,000 cans and bottles.  Follow Ryan below to catch weekly videos with updates and announcing new corporate involvement:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ryans_recycling/status/949807967733452800

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fEMYY5SlyV8&feature=share

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ryansrecycling/videos/773804682828029/

Ford Motor Company Builds STEAM Careers

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FIRST Robotics

Ford Motor Company recognizes that robotics programs are a great way for children to start experiencing STEAM fields in action. For that reason, the company has been supporting FIRST® Robotics for nearly 20 years.

FIRST® – For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology – provides the opportunity for students in grades K–12 to work in teams, bringing STEAM fields to life by building their own robots. For two students in particular, the program was very beneficial to them even after they graduated from college.

Matthew Carpenter and Robert Self – former members of FIRST® – are now full-time employees at Ford through the company’s Ford College Graduate program. The rotational program gives college grads the opportunity to work in several different departments throughout the company over a 32-month period, before committing to an area permanently.

Carpenter became a FIRST® member in high school, after some friends who were heavily involved in the program encouraged him to check it out. “I was one of those kids that always took stuff apart when they were little, so this was right up there with the kind of things I was interested in,” he said.

Carpenter’s team was mentored by Ford employees, which helped him network and, ultimately, get into the Ford College Graduate program. He credits his ability to pick up technical skills like computer aided design and programming to his FIRST® involvement. He said participating in the program made him realize that he liked hands-on problem-solving, which led him to pursue engineering as a career, not just a hobby.

“I learned a lot about communicating with people who have different backgrounds than I do,” Carpenter said. “That’s an essential skill for working in cross-functional teams.”

Self joined the program during his junior year in high school and credits FIRST® with helping guide him toward a definitive career path. He says through the program, he learned core engineering skills that he uses in his position at Ford today.

“At the time, I was really involved in physics and chemistry and the core science and math courses, but I didn’t necessarily know exactly what I wanted to do,” Self said. “Being able to go and work with other high school students and industry mentors, develop my technical skills, and realize how math and science are used outside the classroom really opened up the window for me to realize that I wanted to be an engineer.”

His involvement in FIRST® has come full circle, as he is now on the Ford FIRST® board, working to improve employee involvement with mentoring.

Both Self and Carpenter agree that based on their experience in the Ford College Graduate program so far, it meets its goal – to help millennials build a career with Ford Motor Company.

Source: campaign-social.ford.com

Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching (PAEMST) Rewarding & Inspiring Teaching-Nominations are open!

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PAEMST

Awardee Feature Story: Kendra Renae Pullen

For 35 years, the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching (PAEMST) have been rewarding and inspiring great teaching.

The award, which honors up to 108 teachers each year, recognizes those teachers who develop and implement a high-quality instructional program that is informed by content knowledge and enhances student learning. Since the program’s inception, more than 4,700 teachers have been recognized for their contributions in the classroom and to their profession.

One of those teachers is Kendra “Renae” Pullen, an educator of 18 years. After returning home from the award recognition events in Washington, D.C., Renae says she found her voice through PAEMST.  Her previous “business as usual” attitude rapidly faded away. Renae became eager to expand her current leadership roles and identify new opportunities, such as becoming a Certified Endorsed Teacher Leader with the Louisiana State Department of Education.  She took on the additional role of Adjunct Professor for Louisiana Technical University in Teacher Leadership.

Since then, Renae has gone on to participate in national Kendra Renae Pullenteacher leadership opportunities, receiving several grants, publishing articles, winning additional awards, and more. Her enthusiasm for ensuring the quality education of all students is apparent in all that she undertakes. In 2011, she participated in the White House Champions of Change Event: Women & Girls in STEM. In 2014, she was a convocation participant in the Exploring Opportunities for STEM Teacher Leadership conference, and began working as a member of the Teacher Advisory Council for the National Academies of Science. Through all of these experiences, one question continues to guide Renae: “Our profession needs a voice, why not mine?”

Renae was not selected as an awardee the first time she applied for PAEMST. It was after her second application submission that she was named the Louisiana science awardee. “After I submitted the application the first time,” she says, “I realized that this was something I could do, something I could win!” Renae says “The second time around, I was prepared and excited to apply.” Her advice for teachers considering applying: “Be really clear in how you communicate. Be reflective. This is your story as a teacher – the wonderful teacher that you are – but be honest in your approach and assessment, and it will come through for you.”

About PAEMST: Established by Congress in 1983, the program is the nation’s highest honors for K-12 teachers of mathematics and science (including computer science) and has since honored more than 4,700 teachers who excel in their fields. The National Science Foundation (NSF) administers PAEMST on behalf of The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

PAEMST is currently accepting nominations and applications for the 2017-2018 cycle. Anyone – principals, teachers, parents, students, and general public – may nominate an exceptional mathematics or science teacher. This year’s program is for K-6th grade teachers. The nomination deadline is April 1, 2018, and the application deadline is May 1, 2018. Awardees receive a certificate signed by the President, a trip to Washington, D.C., and a $10,000 award from NSF.

Today’s Google Doodle Celebrates A Landmark Moment In Computer Science

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Google Doodles have featured animated stories and interactive games in the past, but today’s doodle is the first of its kind to grace the search engine’s homepage. Head to Google now and you’ll see a bunny with cube-like blocks topped with carrots. Your mission: Collect the carrots by completing simple lines of code that will move the bunny forward.

Although the bunny might imply an association with spring time, this is no celebratory Easter Doodle. Instead, it’s a celebration of 50 years of kids coding: Five decades ago, the first programming languages for kids were created. It’s fitting, and not coincidental, that the commemoration also falls on the first day of Computer Science Education Week, which runs until 10th December.

Four people — Wally Feurzeig, Seymour Papert, Daniel Bobrow and Cynthia Solomon — are credited with creating Logo, the first programming language specifically intended for children in the late 1960s. At the time, the idea of teaching children how to program computers was a radical one. Papert, who was a cofounder of MIT’s artificial intelligence lab, pioneered this thinking, leading a revolutionary symposium at the university in 1970 called “Teaching Children Thinking.”

Continue onto Refinery29 to read the complete article.

Overcoming the STEM Opportunity Gap

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By Donald E. Bossi, President of FIRST

Our communities – and our classrooms – are more diverse than ever before. In fact, Generation Z and Millennials, who make up nearly half (48 percent) of the United States’ population, are more multicultural in their race and ethnic compositions than previous generations. As demographics continue to shift, so does the opportunity to build a uniquely diverse and innovative workforce – one that can truly address the challenges facing today’s world. However, for this to happen, the faces in the professional pipeline must change and mirror those of our schools and neighborhoods.

As educators, parents, and business leaders, we have a responsibility to offer all students – especially those who are underserved and underrepresented in STEM – equitable opportunities and pathways to success as contributing members of the workforce. It’s no secret that employers are looking for young talent with STEM skills and digital literacy. Moving forward, nearly every career – whether in product development, manufacturing, marketing, or the arts – will be more reliant on tech skills. By 2021, 69 percent of U.S. executives expect to choose job candidates with data science skills over those without. The students best prepared to fill these roles and find success after graduating high school will be those who experience meaningful STEM engagement opportunities throughout their K-12 years.

The foundation of any prosperous society lies in providing accessible advancement opportunities for its citizens. For today’s students, hurdles abound, whether financial, cultural, or geographic. Our responsibility is to ensure all kids have access to the tools they need to secure sustainable, living-wage jobs. Critical to accomplishing this is early exposure to high-quality, hands-on, STEM learning experiences that engage and inspire students. An example of where this type of early exposure is already being offered and is making an impact can be seen in the efforts of a nonprofit organization that I lead called FIRST. FIRST offers a progression of programs beginning at age 6 and continuing through high school that engages kids in a series of mentor-guided robotics competitions and innovation challenges, connecting STEM learning to exciting, real-world activities. In addition to STEM exposure, students in FIRST programs meet mentor role models and learn about innovation, entrepreneurship, and 21st-century skills like teamwork, collaboration, and critical thinking. Research has shown FIRST programs are game-changers for kids, opening them up to a world of opportunity. Additionally, STEM Equity Community Innovation Grants help make these programs available and accessible to underserved communities and underrepresented students, while committed supporters also make more than $50 million in scholarships available annually to graduating FIRST seniors to pursue higher education.

Schools are also recognizing the value that curriculum and environmental changes can have in making a positive impact on student advancement. Across the country, school systems are working hard to ensure all kids feel welcome, have a voice, and receive an equal shot at finding success. In a model worth emulating, a Ypsilanti, Michigan-based school with a large population of underserved students created STEM-centric programs based on the concept and ethos of FIRST. Since making this format change, the school’s graduation rate has jumped from 69 percent to 97 percent. Daily attendance is up from 84 percent to 92 percent, and suspensions have plummeted from 35 percent to the low single digits. At Ypsilanti STEMM Middle College, the STEM-focused curriculum is making tangible differences in the lives of students. One young man overcame a troubled home life to become valedictorian of his class, while another student, dealing with the emotional ramifications of her mother being deported, found a place to explore her interest in science. Thanks to the school’s changes and new concentration on STEM, students can pursue their passions in an affirming environment and gain the skills they’ll need in the modern workforce.

The responsibility to empower students from diverse backgrounds to succeed doesn’t rest solely on nonprofits and schools; it also falls on companies. As a management consulting firm, Booz Allen Hamilton understands this, having recently refreshed its values to include “Collective Ingenuity” or the ability to harness the power of diversity. Booz Allen Hamilton reflects Collective Ingenuity in its hiring practices, its community-support efforts – including supporting many FIRST teams – and how it approaches client challenges. They and other companies have a critical role to play in bolstering diversity in STEM, whether by providing scholarships to underserved and underrepresented students, offering relatable mentors for female and minority students, or awarding internships to students who otherwise wouldn’t have those prospects. They realize we shouldn’t be leaving talent on the table and are taking the necessary steps to ensure we don’t.

Together, businesspeople, educators, and nonprofit leaders can ensure we aren’t ignoring the potential of our diverse student population when it comes to STEM outcomes. That starts with investing in your community: Get to know the young faces in your local schools and neighborhoods. Find out what they need for success, and connect them with resources and youth-serving programs – like FIRST – that can help them get there. We need kids of all backgrounds, capabilities, and social circumstances to contribute and participate in addressing the world’s toughest challenges. With equitable access to opportunity, relevant mentorship, and engagement, any student can build a foundation for a bright future.

Green Bronx Machine—Shares The Story Of Their Impact

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Fresh Lessons

Green Bronx Machine has made the COVER story of TIME for KIDS Magazine and they’re delighted to share the story of their impact!

And speaking of impact, their after-school program held in the National Health Wellness & Learning Center is making epic happen daily. Serving the most at-risk children in the school from 2:30 – 5 PM daily, they have:
• helped solve 1,914 math problems
• analyzed 514 reading passages
• completed 272 outstanding assignments
• cooked 26 gourmet meals from scratch, including their signature dish: St. Paul’s Stir Fry!

They are incorporating recipes from all around the world and even FaceTimed with Spaniards about Paella. And they’re just getting started! Last week they ordered 25 sets of leveled texts so they can start their Reading and Book Club. They will be reading all winter long until 6 PM at the Center.

Input equals output! Last week they fed all 750+ students in the school a healthy, locally grown meal via their School Garden to School Cafeteria Program. Clean plates and healthy smiles are their signature, but most importantly eating healthy food across the rainbow. Attendance at the school is at an all time high, and their after-school program is booked to capacity every day!

With results like these and waitlists of children to serve, now more than ever they need your support. They remain a volunteer program and are seeking funds to hire two local dedicated after school tutors – academic specialists so they can bridge the performance gap for their students. Given increasing costs, providing children & families with healthy, fresh ingredients & meals is more challenging than ever.

Green Bronx Machine

Can Robots Help Get More Girls into Science and Tech?

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HERE’S A DEPRESSING number for you: 12. Just 12 percent of engineers in the United States are women. In computing it’s a bit better, where women make up 26 percent of the workforce—but that number has actually fallen from 35 percent in 1990.

The United States has a serious problem with getting women into STEM jobs and keeping them there. Silicon Valley and other employers bear the most responsibility for that: Discrimination, both overt and subtle, works to keep women out of the workforce. But this society of ours also perpetuates gender stereotypes, which parents pass on to their kids. Like the one that says boys enjoy building things more than girls.

There’s no single solution to such a daunting problem, but here’s an unlikely one: robots. Not robots enforcing diversity in the workplace, not robots doing all the work and obviating the concept of gender entirely, but robots getting more girls interested in STEM. Specifically, robot kits for kids—simple yet powerful toys for teaching youngsters how to engineer and code.

Plenty of toys are targeted at getting kids interested in science and engineering, and many these days are gender specific. Roominate, for instance, is a building kit tailored for girls, while the Boolean Box teaches girls to code. “Sometimes there’s this idea that girls need special Legos, or it needs to be pink and purple for girls to get into it, and sometimes that rubs me the wrong way,” says Amanda Sullivan, who works in human development at Tufts University. “If the pink and purple colored tools is what’s going to engage that girl, then that’s great. But I think in general it would be great if there were more tools and books and things that were out there for all children.”

So Sullivan decided to test the effects of a specifically non-gendered robotics kit called Kibo. Kids program the rolling robot by stringing together blocks that denote specific commands. It isn’t marketed specifically to boys or girls using stereotypical markings of maleness or femaleness. It’s a blank slate.

Before playing with Kibo, boys were significantly more likelyto say they’d enjoy being an engineer than the girls did. But after, boys had about the same opinion, while girls were now equally as likely to express an engineering interest as the boys. (In a control group that did not play with Kibo, girls’ opinions did not significantly change.) “I think that robots in general are novel to young children, both boys and girls,” Sullivan says. “So aside from engaging girls specifically, I think robotics kits like Kibo bring an air of excitement and something new to the classroom that gets kids psyched and excited about learning.”

Continue onto WIRED to read the complete article.

Meet a NASA Astronaut at WonderWorks, As Science & Space Fans Enjoy an Intergalactic Weekend

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NASA Exhibit

WonderWorks in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee has planned a temporary exhibit that is out of this world, and everyone is invited to blast off with it.

The indoor park that combines amusement and educational opportunities is hosting a NASA exhibit from October 5-8, 2017 that will focus on the amazing world of science and the planets. The exhibit will feature scaled models of spacecraft and a virtual reality experience of NASA’s new rocket, the Space Launch System. There will also be artifacts such as a real moon rock that people can touch, and a meet and greet with former space shuttle astronaut Captain Robert “Hoot” Gibson. The fun and educational exhibit is slated to help further interest in STEM education and careers and is ideal for all ages.

“This is such an exciting exhibit for people and we are thrilled to be hosting it,” states Ed Shaffer, General Manager for WonderWorks. “Being able to meet a real astronaut and touch a moon rock is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity and one that you don’t want to miss.”

astronaut Captain Robert “Hoot” Gibson
Former Astronaut-Captain Robert “Hoot” Gibson

The NASA exhibit will kick off with Captain Gibson visiting local middle schools to speak to students about his experience being in space. He will be at WonderWorks in Pigeon Forge on Saturday, October 7, 2017. Meet and greet opportunities are from 11 a.m. to noon, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m., and from 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., where he will answer questions, pose for photos, and give autographs. Media interviews will also be available.

The NASA exhibit will feature:
• The Exploration Systems virtual tour allows participants to experience the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft up close as they sit on the mobile launcher at Kennedy Space Center. Users will be transported to Launchpad 39B where they will receive a brief overview of the different components that make up the most powerful rocket ever built, the SLS. Once the overview is complete, they will then be placed inside an Orion Spacecraft virtual environment prior to launch.
• Guest will be able to take and print a photo of themselves in a spacesuit with either an SLS, Orion, Mars rover, or International Space Station background. This is a one-of-a-kind keepsake!
• Space Launch System 1:50 scale model on a mobile launcher and a 1:20 scale Orion Spacecraft table top model.
• Touchable moon rock from the Apollo 17 mission.

“We are ready to grow interest in space explorations,” added Shaffer. “There will be plenty of opportunities for pictures, asking questions, and observing, making it an amazing experience for all.”

Capt. Robert “Hoot” Gibson served as a NASA astronaut from 1979 until 1996 and is a veteran of five space shuttle flights. He has logged more than 36 days in space, including having commanded the first docking of the space shuttle to the Russian space station Mir. He is also a graduate of the TOPGUN Navy Fighter Weapons School.

WonderWorks in Pigeon Forge offers 35,000 square feet of “edu-tainment” opportunities, billing itself as an amusement park for the mind. They offer over 100 hands-on exhibits covering natural disasters, space discovery, an imagination lab, a physical challenge zone, a far out art gallery, and a light and sound zone. WonderWorks is open daily from 10 a.m. until 9 p.m. For more information or to register for the event, log onto their site: wonderworksonline.com/pigeon-forge/nasa-journey-mars/.

About WonderWorks
WonderWorks, a science focused indoor amusement park, combines education and entertainment. With over 100 hands-on exhibits – there is something unique and challenging for all ages. Feel the power of 71mph hurricane–force winds in the Hurricane Shack. Make huge, life–sized bubbles in the Bubble Lab. Get the NASA treatment in our Astronaut Training Gyro and experience zero gravity. Nail it by lying on the death–defying Bed of Nails. Conquer your fear of heights on our indoor Glow-In-The-Dark Ropes Course. WonderWorks is also home to Wonders of Magic, starring Terry Evanswood, the award-winning and longest running performer in Pigeon Forge. WonderWorks hosts birthday parties and special events seasonally. Open daily from 9 a.m. until midnight. wonderworksonline.com/pigeon-forge.

Robots, Race Cars and Weather: Girl Scouts Offer New Badges

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Girl Scouts from tiny Daisies to teen Ambassadors may earn 23 new badges focused on science, technology, engineering and math.

It’s the largest addition of new badges in a decade for Girl Scouts of the USA. The effort takes a progressive approach to STEM and also nudges girls to become citizen scientists using the great outdoors as their laboratory.

Among the new badges are those that introduce kindergarten and first graders to the world of robots and engineering. Scouts can learn basic programming and build prototypes to solve everyday problems. Older scouts will have the chance to enhance those skills, learning more about artificial intelligence, algorithms and how to formally present their work.

Other new badges focus on race car and aviation design using kits from GoldieBlox, a girl-focused toy company. The “leave no trace” approach to interacting with the environment and the study of meteorology by learning to predict weather patterns and potential hazards are among activities geared to new outdoors badges.

Cayla Hicks, 7, is grateful. She’s a Baltimore Brownie who’s interested in the “Designing Robots” badge.

“I want to be a scientist. I like building things and I like discovering things. Me and my brother — well, I usually ask my brother if he wants to look through my telescope. Usually he says no,” Cayla said as she recently demonstrated how to make a “robotic arm” out of sticks and fasteners.

Baby boomer Sylvia Acevedo, the CEO of the scouting group, was just like Cayla as a girl growing up in tiny Las Cruces, New Mexico.

“My troop leader looked at me and saw me looking at the stars, and she taught me that there were constellations, she taught me there were systems and patterns to the stars,” Acevedo said in a recent interview. “Because I got my science badge I developed that courage and that confidence to study science and math at a time when girls like me weren’t studying science and math. Girls like me, statistically, weren’t even finishing high school.”

Acevedo was one of the first Hispanic students, male or female, to earn a graduate engineering degree from Stanford University. The former tech executive’s first job was as a rocket scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California.

The new badges , some of which were requested by scouts themselves in a survey, are available starting this week.

Continue onto the New York Times to read the complete article.

The World’s Cutest Robot Now Teaches You To Code

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STRAIGHT OUT OF the box, Anki’s adorable robot Cozmo plays games, fist bumps, and uses its big, blue digital eyes to convey convincing emotional range. And its brain uses machine learning, so it gets more savvy as you play with it.

An update lets Cozmo start teaching you new skills as well. Anki‘ new app Coding Lab uses Cozmo to teach kids (and kids at heart) how to program.

Cozmo was not designed to teach, but that’s what makes the little rolling bot so good at it. Anki’s founders spent four years packing Cozmo with tech like facial recognition, machine learning, and automated path planning. (Its real brain runs off of a cloud-connected engine via your phone or tablet.) It turns out those 1.6 million lines of code are a powerful tool for demystifying robotics.

“We realized Cozmo is very much like an operating system like iOS or Android, but for a robot,” says Hanns Tappeiner, Anki president and co-founder. The company opened up that operating system last year with a software development kit that lets professional roboticists program Cozmo to do things like play tic-tac-toe or set an alarm clock. Programmers hooked up the little bot to Google’s image recognition cloud, effectively turning it into a bewildered 2-year-old. “It would go around saying, ‘Oooh sunglasses, oooh a Coke can,'” Tappeiner says.

Using the scripting language Python, researchers could program Cozmo to do pretty much anything. But Anki design Cozmo for kids, not roboticists. “What we figured out was there was no reason why we couldn’t make the exact same functionality available for our more core audience,” he says. “So not for a Carnegie Mellon researcher, but for an 8 year old.”

That required translating all that code from Python to Scratch, a simple programming language MIT developed developed for use in elementary and middle schools. Today, nearly all of Cozmo’s functionality is tidily wrapped up in graphical blocks of code that users drag and drop onto the app’s interface. That makes easy to make Cozmo do things like roll forward and then turn left. Repeat that block of code four times, and you’ve taught Cozmo to make a square on your kitchen table.

Continue onto WIRED to read the complete article and watch a video of Cozmo