How Do You Make a Living, Entrepreneur?

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By Noah Davis

Caterina Fake is an unlikely entrepreneur. The co-founder of start-ups like Flickr, Hunch, and Findery graduated from Vassar with an English degree and spent most of her 20s backpacking around South America. Eventually, however, she found her way to the Internet, where she married her artistic sensibilities with her interest in technology. The rest is photo-sharing history. She talked to Pacific Standard about skipping class, the value of a liberal arts education, and the most difficult language to learn.

What was your education like growing up?

I loved learning and sometimes school got in the way of learning. My grades reflected that. If I loved a teacher and was learning a lot, my grades were as high as they could be. If the teacher was uninspired or reading from a textbook, I didn’t bother going. I read everything, all the time, and was always writing my own books and making a lot of art. We recorded radio shows and wrote software. Creating, not consuming.

Did you feel like you were smarter than your classmates?

This is a dangerous question to answer affirmatively. I was in a gifted children’s program in 4th and 5th grade, and went to college when I was 11, through the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth. But I didn’t like being called “gifted;” it felt weird.

You went to a liberal arts college. Why did you choose to do that? How do you think that impacted the rest of your career?

If it were not for the liberal arts, I would not be who I am. I learned how to write, read, ask questions. I learned to cultivate sensitivity to people and their individual selves. I learned to observe and understand. So much of life is expended in working and being entertained, and it’s important to learn to be alive to the world around you.

Do you read for pleasure? If so, what?

I read, but I wouldn’t say it’s solely for pleasure, as I also read for edification, information, enlightenment, epiphany. Reading, if you’re doing it right, transforms you. Right now I am reading Infinite Jest, one of those books everyone owns, but nobody’s read. I am not enjoying it. When I see it on the bedside table, again, I feel dread.

You’ve found success combining art and technology. Why do you think you’ve been so successful melding the two together? Is there something about the way that you think and see connections that has made you successful?

Conveniently, I love both art and technology. Loving things makes it easy to make decisions about what to do. In addition to building my own start-ups, I’ve been able to invest in other people’s companies that combine the creative with the technological, such as Etsy and Kickstarter, which are also worthy of love. I am drawn to such businesses. They manage to find me too, because of this affinity.

What’s one thing you’d like to learn? Do you still pursue formal education or does it come more haphazardly through your career?

I’ve been studying Finnish for the past couple years. We go to Finland often. We opened a cafe in Helsinki this past summer. The children speak Finnish, and I love languages. Finnish is by far the most difficult thing I have ever attempted to learn, and that includes calculus. I wasn’t good at calculus either, but I was less invested in learning it. I’ve studied Chinese, Latin, French, and Spanish, but Finnish is so hard, I have nearly given up a dozen times. I have to take a month off, periodically, before I can return for more punishment.

I also like learning various musical instruments. I can play a few stringed instruments (guitar, ukulele, piano, violin, banjo), all of them badly. I like singing, dancing, and camping.

What are you working on now?

Kahvila Siili, in Helsinki. Findery, in San Francisco. Homeschooling, all over the world. Writing. Thinking. Making art. Reading. Some of these don’t really seem like work. I just joined the Sundance board. I am excited about movies again!

In one interview you said, “I don’t think my parents were very optimistic about my post-college opportunities.” Has that opinion changed?

After college I spent a lot of time backpacking around South America, and doing odd jobs. I was only sporadically employed. And I didn’t find the Internet as a place to work until I was in my late 20s. Many years have transpired between then and now. Things have worked out for me! But I’m not a trophy collector, and I was born on third base. I count my blessings.

Who should I talk to next?

[Groupon founder] Andrew Mason. He’s another awesome, liberal arts loving entrepreneur. He is also funny. Ask him about the state of literature, music, and media.

Source: psnmag.com, https://psmag.com/how-do-you-make-a-living-entrepreneur-a3a6457d0c66

TFS Scholarships Launches Online Toolkit to Provide College Funding Resources

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SALT LAKE CITY— TFS Scholarships (TFS), the most comprehensive online resource for higher education funding, has launched a free online toolkit to provide counselors, families and students with resources to help improve the college scholarship search process. The toolkit, available at tuitionfundingsources.com/resource-toolkit, provides downloadable resources and practical tips on how to find and apply for scholarships.

The launch comes in celebration with Financial Aid Awareness Month when many families are beginning the FAFSA process and researching financial aid options.

“We hope these resources help raise awareness around TFS and the 7 million college scholarships available to undergraduate, graduate and professional students,” said Richard Sorensen, president of TFS Scholarships. “Our goal is to help families discover alternative ways to offset the rising costs of higher education.”

The resource toolkit includes flyers, email templates, newsletter content, digital banners and table toppers which are designed to be shareable content that counselors, students and organizations can use to spread the word about how to find free money for college.

The newly revamped TFS website curates over 7 million scholarship opportunities from across the country – with the majority coming directly from colleges and universities—and matches them to students based on their personal profile, where they want to study, and stage of academic study. By tailoring the search criteria, TFS identifies scholarships that students are uniquely qualified for, thus lowering the application pool and increasing the chances of winning. By creating an online profile, students can find scholarships representing more than $41 billion in aid. About 5,000 new scholarships are added to the database every month and appear in real time.

Thanks to exclusive financial support from Wells Fargo, the TFS website is completely ad-free, and no selling of data, making it a safe and trusted place to search.

For more information about Tuition Funding Sources visit tuitionfundingsources.com.

 

About TFS Scholarships

TFS Scholarships (TFS) is an independent service that provides free access to scholarship opportunities for aspiring and current undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. Founded in 1987, TFS began as a passion project to help students and has grown into the most comprehensive online resource for higher education funding. Today, TFS is a trusted place where students and families enjoy free access to more than 7 million scholarships representing more than $41 billion in college funding. In addition to its vast database that’s refreshed with 5,000 new scholarships every month, TFS also offers information about career planning, financial aid, and federal and private student loan programs as part of its commitment to helping students fund their future. Learn more at tuitionfundingsources.com.

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8 Inefficiencies in the Architecture + Design Industry (and possible solutions)

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MRad

LOS ANGELES, California – (February 7, 2018) – Every industry has their fair share of inefficiencies which can stifle production. But once in a while, a leader comes along who can not only identify the problems, but also offer solutions. These thought leaders have the ability to revolutionize an industry. The world of architecture and design is not immune to inefficiencies, but one industry leader has some ideas on how to fix the broken system.

“You never bathe in the same river twice, because things change, which keeps everything fresh and interesting,” explains Matthew Rosenberg, the founder of M-Rad Architecture + Design, located in Los Angeles. “The same goes for the architecture and design field, where for far too long the river was standing idle, becoming stagnant. Our business model and proposed solutions are helping to get it flowing once again.”

As a forward thinker in the field, Rosenberg has identified 8 major inefficiencies in the architecture and design industry, as well as a solution for each of them. They include:

  1. PROBLEM: Brokers. Paying a middleman to find projects takes away revenue for the architect.
    SOLUTION: Cut out the Broker by forming relationships directly with developers and clients.
  2. PROBLEM:Underpaid, overworked designers and architects. The architecture industry is notorious for low wages, heavy workload, stressful deadlines until you “make it” to the top.
    SOLUTION: Allow the designers and architects to take equity in their projects.
  3. PROBLEM:Designing independently from actual community needs.  When architecture firms design a building for a client without considering the needs and wants of the surrounding area, the project may not benefit the community or the client.
    SOLUTION: Use a positioning tactic to understand what the community is lacking and incorporate these ideas into the project.
  4. PROBLEM:The industry is heavily reliant on unpredictable markets. With the real estate marketing and cost of living in constant flux, it’s difficult to predict the stability of the industry, which is reliant on the financial status of the client.
    SOLUTION: Consistency, strategic business moves, and keeping an eye on markets allows architecture and design firms to be proactive and shift their practice to better suit the economy.
  5. PROBLEM:City planning process and restrictions. Sometimes designing or building structures takes many years, as they are stuck in the city planning process. One minor mistake can set a project back months or sometimes even years.
    SOLUTION: It can be difficult to get around or speed up the city planning process, but being involved in the community, town hall meetings, and voting on city measures can help improve the process.
  6. PROBLEM:Politics within the industry. Politics occur in every industry, but when millions of dollars are exchanged, expectations are high, and egos can get in the way of business.  The political elements in Architecture can get sticky.
    SOLUTION: Stay professional and only partner/work with people who have positive reputations.
  7. PROBLEM:The scope of the architect is becoming smaller. Technology advancements cause more complex buildings, which causes increase in liability and legal aggression which prompts architects to hand off elements of the design process to “experts in their field,” ultimately chipping away the responsibility and profits of the architect.
    SOLUTION: Increase the scope of the architect.
  8. PROBLEM:Stealing intellectual property. It’s hard to determine when a design is stolen or original.
    SOLUTION: No real solution. Can try to prevent your design being stolen by trademarking, keeping records, photographing the design progress, certifying the design, and by being careful of releasing designs to public view.

“At our firm, we have gone to great lengths to determine effective solutions to the inefficiencies within the architecture and design field,” added Rosenberg. “By making these changes, we are benefiting those who work in the field, as well as those we build the projects for. It’s a win-win for everyone to create the most efficient field that we can.”

Rosenberg‘s firm is on a mission to create better communities, neighborhoods, and cities. Their system includes a multi-faceted approach that starts with pre-architecture, maintains during the architecture phase, and continues during post-architecture.

Born and raised in Saskatoon, Canada, Rosenberg spent nine years studying architecture and environmental design. Rosenberg has earned bachelor degrees in fine arts and environmental design in architecture, as well as a master degree in architecture. When he was ready to bring his architectural influence back to the West, he headed to Los Angeles to launch M-Rad and start making a difference.

About M-Rad Architecture

M-Rad Architecture + Design, based in Los Angeles, is revolutionizing the industry by revealing inefficiencies and creating solutions to universal problems. Their multi-faceted business model, allows M-Rad to expand the scope of the architect and build resilient communities through enhanced experiences. The M-Rad team is currently working on projects around the world; from apartment buildings in Los Angeles, to a private members club in Philadelphia, to a boutique hotel in Taipei. They have created mixed-use towers, luxury hotels, sports parks, and more. For additional information on the company and to view their unique business model, visit: https://www.m-rad.com.

 

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This One Simple Thing Can Help You Learn Better

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Listening to Music

Next time your dormie tells you to turn the music down, just reply, “it’s helping me learn!” A study by the Stanford University School of Medicine found that listening to music can help the brain focus and organize information.

Listening—And Learning

For decades, researchers have been studying the link between learning and listening to music. The concept was introduced into the popular imagination in the early 1990s, when Dr. Alfred A. Tomatis coined the phrase “the Mozart effect.” The term referred to Dr. Tomatis’ finding that listening to Mozart could temporarily improve performance on certain spatial-temporal reasoning tasks, such as the Stanford-Binet IQ test. People quickly mis-translated the finding to “listening to Mozart makes you smarter,” and a new industry was born: To this day, there are all sorts of “intelligence-boosting” products available that claim to harness the power of Mozart.

The link between music and learning isn’t all hype, however. A 2009 study by Joseph M. Piro and Camilo Ortiz published in the Psychology of Music journal found that children who were exposed to music training performed better on vocabulary and reading comprehension tests than those who were not. The researchers hypothesized that studying music helped the children develop the mental coding systems necessary to learn language. Although they acknowledge that this is only a preliminary study—simply having different language instructors may have led to measurable differences in ability—the project is part of a growing body of research that suggests that music and learning are correlated.

Music Helps the Brain Focus

Enter the research team at the Stanford University School of Medicine. During a study designed to measure how the brain sorts out different events, they stumbled upon a concrete physiological link between the acts of listening to music and learning. The researchers played short symphonies by obscure 18th-century composers to subjects while scanning their brains with functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI. The research group found that music “lights up” areas of the brain involved with making predictions, paying attention and committing details to memory.

But don’t switch on that stereo just yet—peak brain activity actually occurred between musical movements. Dr. Vinod Menon, the study’s senior author, noted that “In a concert setting, for example, different individuals listen to a piece of music with wandering attention, but at the transition point between movements, their attention is arrested.” In other words, you get the most brain activity just after, or between, intense musical movements.

“I’m not sure if the baroque composers would have thought of it in this way,” Menon added, “but certainly from a modern neuroscience perspective, our study shows that this is a moment when individual brains respond in a tightly synchronized manner.”

So what does this mean for students? While Stanford hasn’t published a “learning with music” guide just yet, we think it probably can’t hurt to incorporate some tunes into your studying routine. Just remember: Study during the interludes.

Source: Study.com

NewME, A Pioneer in Tech Diversity

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NewME Angela Benton

Founded in 2011 by Angela Benton, NewME has accelerated hundreds of entrepreneurs through their online platform, residential “boot-camp” accelerators and equity portfolio. They pioneered diversity in Silicon Valley by focusing on helping entrepreneurs identify strengths from their non-traditional backgrounds and leveraging them in business. They’ve helped hundreds of entrepreneurs build better businesses some of whom have raised venture capital funding ($25+MM to be exact).

NewME has announced the relocation of its headquarters from Silicon Valley to Miami with $191,000 in support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. The support will also help NewME expand existing programming focused on providing entrepreneurs with the advice, skills and access to resources that will support their success. By expanding its programming, NewME aims to improve the success of black-led startups through mentorship, coaching and community convenings. Through the program, black entrepreneurs and their businesses will further learn from and be exposed to angel and venture capital investors, along with NewME’s professional investor network.

NewME will target both local and global talent through weekly programming and monthly events, and connect them to online resources through the NewME platform. In addition, the accelerator will host quarterly one-week residential boot camps, which bring together a select group of tech entrepreneurs from around the world; industry experts then work with entrepreneurs to help accelerate their businesses. Additionally, NewME will hire a Miami-based program manager who will support the growth and sustainability of local black and other underrepresented minority-owned businesses.

“Relocating NewME to Miami was a natural choice given its diverse makeup,” says Angela Benton, founder of NewME. “Miami is already an international hub for innovation and the local community is rich with talent. I’m excited to continue my work with NewME in our new, inclusive home.”

Source: knightfoundation.org

Dollar General Announces Call for New Vendors

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Suppliers, companies and manufacturers with exciting new products who want to reach millions of consumers and partner with one of America’s fastest-growing retailers that is currently listed #128 on the Fortune 500 list and posted $22 billion in FY 2016 sales, listen up!

Dollar General (NYSE: DG) is encouraging new suppliers and those who have not sold products to the Company within the past 18 months to apply to attend its inaugural Innovation and Supplier Diversity Summit in April 2018. The event aims to pair potential new vendors with respective Dollar General buyers and category managers. Suppliers must sell items in at least one of the following categories to be eligible to attend:

  • Beauty, Personal Care and Over-the-Counter/Wellness
  • General Merchandise/All Non-Food
  • Grocery.

“As part of Dollar General’s continual commitment to provide quality products at everyday low prices to our diverse consumer base, we are thrilled to announce our first Innovation and Supplier Diversity Summit scheduled for this spring,” said Jason Reiser, Dollar General’s executive vice president and chief merchandising officer. “Having the right products to best meet our customers’ needs is a foundational cornerstone at Dollar General. As such, we look forward to meeting with potential new vendors, learning about relevant products for our customers and expanding the number of unique and specialized offerings available in our stores.”

To apply, interested suppliers, companies and manufacturers may submit their product information at www.rangeme.com/dollargeneralfrom Tuesday, January 30 through end of day on Tuesday, February 20, 2018. Selected companies will be subject to a $500 participation fee and notified via email by Efficient Collaborative Retail Marketing (ECRM) of the time, date and location of their meeting with a member of the Dollar General merchandising team.

Continue onto Business Wire to read the complete article.

There’s green in being gay: LGBT businesses contribute $1.7 trillion to the U.S. economy

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The National Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce (NGLCC), a trade group that represents businesses owned by lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgenders, reported this week that the typical LGBT business has been in business, on average, for more than 12 years and that LGBT businesses contribute more than $1.7 trillion to the U.S. economy and have created more than 33,000 jobs.

The report serves as a reminder of the enormous and growing role LGBT entrepreneurs and business owners have in the United States. But it also sends a message to the community: if you’re an LGBT business then get certified as one. Otherwise, you’re missing out on some money.

More than 10 years ago the chamber created a certification program to recognize its best-in-class members. According to the chamber’s press release “over a third of the Fortune 500, many top federal agencies (including the Small Business Administration, Department of Transportation, and the Department of Agriculture), the Commonwealths of Massachusetts and Pennsylvania, major urban municipalities (including King County, WA; Essex County, NJ; and San Francisco, CA), and the Public Utilities Commission of California actively seek out certified LGBT businesses

Continue onto the Washington Post to read the complete article.

How To Talk About The Gap In Your Work History

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Sometimes, addressing it directly can be your best option.

Whether you’re gearing up for a triumphant return to the workforce or grappling with the best way to explain a recent gap in your employment history, addressing time away from the professional world can be a daunting task. Given that a glaring hole on your resume will likely be a red flag to prospective employers, you’ll want to take steps to proactively answer questions they may have.

Balancing your need to provide a reasonable explanation with your right to privacy might be a bit tricky, but it’s far from impossible. Employment gaps can easily be addressed directly on a resume, mentioned in a cover letter, or discussed during an interview. Read through the approaches below to determine the strategy (or strategies!) that’ll work best for you.

ADDRESSING GAPS DIRECTLY ON YOUR RESUME

When it comes to a gap in employment on your resume, it’s best not to leave recruiters guessing. Including a brief blurb about your time away from the workforce will serve to proactively address any questions or concerns prospective employers may have. It’ll also make answering questions about that gap on your resume much easier when it comes time to interview, as you’ll have already laid the foundation for a direct, concise response. Let’s take a look at five common scenarios and how to address them.

1)  YOU WERE RAISING A FAMILY

Taking time away from the workforce to raise a child is often a deeply personal decision–-one that you may not want to discuss with a prospective employer. This is perfectly understandable, and frankly, no one’s business! That said, being upfront about your time away could increase your chances of landing an interview by as much as 40%, so it’s worth including a brief, professional explanation. Try creating a “recent experience” section below your previous, more relevant work history, or use a single line in your chronological experience section to explain your time away. Something as simple as, “Family Care Provider, 2013–Present” will do the trick.

Highlighting charity work or continuing education courses will help to smooth over a gap, too. Volunteering in a classroom, helping out with a friend’s business, or taking professional courses can all be included as relevant recent experience.

Continue onto Fast Company to read the complete article.

Tech’s New Hotbeds: Cities With Fastest Growth In STEM Jobs Are Far From Silicon Valley

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The conventional wisdom sees tech concentrating in a handful of places, many dense urban cores that offer the best jobs and draw talented young people. These places are seen as so powerful that, as The New York Times recently put it, they have little need to relate to other, less fashionable cities.

To a considerable extent, that was true – until it wasn’t. The most recent data on STEM jobs – in science, technology, engineering or mathematics – suggests that tech jobs, with some exceptions, are shifting to smaller, generally more affordable places.

What we may be witnessing, in fact, is a third turning in the tech world. The initial phase, in the 1950s, was mostly suburban – dominated by the still-powerful Bay Area, Boston and Southern California – and was heavily tied to aerospace and defense. The second phase, now coming to a close, refocused tech growth in two hot spots, the Bay Area and Washington’s Puget Sound, and largely involved social media, search and digital applications for business services.

The third tech turning, now in its infancy, promises greater dispersion to other markets, some with strong tech backgrounds, some with far less. In the last two years, according to numbers for the country’s 53 largest metros compiled by Praxis Strategy Group’s Mark Schill based on federal data and EMSI’s fourth-quarter 2017 data set, the STEM growth leader has been Orlando, at 8%, three times the national average. Next are San Francisco and Charlotte (each at 7%); Grand Rapids, Michigan (6%); and then Salt Lake City, Tampa, Seattle, Raleigh, Miami and Las Vegas (5%).

Why Are New Players Rising?

Silicon Valley, along with its urban annex, San Francisco, seems likely to remain the tech center for the foreseeable future. The area accounted for 44% of the country’s venture capital funding in 2014, according to a Brookings analysis of Pitchbook data, and the San Jose and San Francisco regions’ STEM employment – more than 440,000 jobs – is larger than that of greater New York, which has more than twice the population. The highest location quotient, essentially the percentage of STEM jobs per capita, can be found in the Valley – a remarkable 3.38 in 2017 – while the San Francisco area comes in at roughly half that rate, with an LQ of 1.76, just behind the figures for Seattle and Washington, DC.

But recently there have been signs that the tech sector’s growth in the region is slowing, despite the presence of Google, Facebook and Apple, three of the world’s most highly valued companies. From 2006 to 2016, the Valley saw a remarkable 33% growth rate in STEM jobs – roughly 3% per year. But in the last two years, that rate has fallen to 2% annually. In some recent months in parts of the Bay Area, The San Jose Mercury reports, the tech job count has actually declined.

One limiting factor could be high housing costs. A recent report from the state Legislative Analyst’s Office showed that many CEOs, particularly in Silicon Valley, regard severe housing unaffordability – where you need to earn more than $200,000 annually to buy a median-priced house – as their biggest business challenge.

The effects can be seen in domestic migration, which despite the boom has been declining since 2012. Old-time Silicon Valley residents can celebrate the rapid appreciation of their homes, but for new entrants the prospects are bleak. If millennials continue their current rate of savings, notes one study, it would take them 28 years to qualify for a median-priced house in the San Francisco area – compared with five years in Charlotte, or three years in Atlanta. This may be one reason that, according to a recent ULI report, 74% of Bay Area millennials are considering a move out of the region in the next five years.

Who Are These New Players?

If the Valley is slowing, one might expect the slack to be picked up in places that are heralded – at least by their boosters – as tech havens, places like Chicago, New York and Los Angeles. Instead, the fastest STEM growth is occurring in somewhat less ballyhooed places that have far lower housing costs and typically have less onerous tax and regulatory regimes.

Several factors may be in play. In the early part of the decade, notes a 2016 Brookings study, software focused on such things as search, social media and systems design; now, much of the impetus is coming from manufacturing-related industries, such as autos and industrial products, which may help explain the strong growth experienced by places like Grand Rapids.

That metro is also home to 17 universities and colleges, which guarantee a steady flow of tech workers. Low housing costs are certainly a potential allure; Trulia recently ranked the region as the housing market best “poised for growth” in 2018. The area boasts successful firms like Open Systems Technologies, a provider of IT services that employs about 140 people in its headquarters near downtown.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

The Top 10 Architectural Trends that Should Be Left Behind in 2018

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Smart Coffee Table

Each year, as technology progresses and lifestyles evolve, old trends are replaced with new ones. This process happens across all industries including architecture and design. But trends don’t appear from thin air – typically change comes from progressive industry leaders who are one step ahead of their competition. As new trends emerge providing better options, it’s time to expire outdated ones.

“We are happy to be at the forefront of change in the world of architecture,” explains Matthew Rosenberg, Founder of M-Rad, an architecture and design studio located in Los Angeles, California. “While some trends hold steady and survive the test of time, some trends should never have developed in the first place.”

Here are the top 10 architectural trends that should be left behind in 2018:

1. Furniture designer knockoffs. In 2017 millions of knock-off furniture pieces were sold, but what most people don’t realize is that supporting these cheaply made goods results in negative outcomes. Often there are safety risks and questionable labor practices involved. If you can’t afford the real deal, save until you can and support the craftsmanship and moral labor practices of authentic goods.

2. Artificial turf. While during drought stricken times, ripping up your lawn and replacing it with artificial turf may have seemed like a good idea, research shows ‘fake grass’ is harmful to the environment and human health. The synthetic fibers in artificial turf are typically chemical-laden, end up in landfills and eventually the chemicals seep into our oceans, contaminating marine life. While real grass and soil naturally regenerates itself and recycles the air, an organic process which lowers C02 emissions- artificial turf does not, creating a ‘heat trap’ layer which adds to global warming problems and allows bacteria and mold to grow, making it harmful for kids and pets.

3. Greenwashing. The words “green” and “sustainable” don’t mean much in the marketing world anymore. These words, and even the use of the color green have been so overused by industries to sell products (which may not even be at all environmentally friendly), consumers don’t know what is actually a healthy or sustainable product anymore. Since there is no true definition or regulation of the words, leaving them behind will give people a chance to evaluate a product without fear of misconception.<

4. Instagram Museums. Creating art merely for the sake social media hits is a trend that should be left behind in 2018. Instagram museums and art murals created solely for the purpose of social media misses the point of developing a piece of art. Art should be created for the sake of self-expression, not Instagram followers.

5. Realtors and Brokers. Leaving out the “middleman” in real estate transactions is a trend that will save buyers a lot of money. The future is designers working directly with developers. Cutting out the middlemen allows architects and designers to have more control and equity with the projects, which will help reduce costs for buyers.

6. ‘Smart’ coffee tables. A coffee table was never supposed to be a catch all, with a refrigerator, charging stations, lights, speakers, and more. Such all-in-one designs might make sense in a ‘man cave’ or den, but not for use in the everyday home setting. “Smart” coffee tables promote laziness and tend to look cheap and unattractive.

7. Patterned facades. One look around a newly developed city block and it’s clear to see, the patterned facade trend has gone too far. Facades are not always necessary however if using a facade, one simple pattern is more appealing than going overboard with multiple layers, textures, and patterns.

8. Basic residential interiors. As the “hygge” lifestyle becomes more popular, boring designs, flat ceilings, box style rooms will become a thing of the past. Complex designed ceilings, secret reading nooks and cozy crannies, unique lighting, and interesting angles are much more appealing than walking in a basic, square sterile room.

9. Dining Rooms. Millennials are buying houses now, and do not use a dining room for formal dinners like their mothers and grandmothers once did. The new norm is converting the dining room into a more efficient and useful multi-purpose space such as an office/ dining or additional living space.

10. One level parking lots.  As cities become more populated and real estate less abundant, one level parking lots will begin to convert to stacked parking or multilevel to make the most efficient use of valuable space. In the future, as lack of parking and green space continue to be a problem in growing cities, we will see designers and architects start to implement hybrid parking/ green space structures.

“The architecture industry is evolving at a rapid speed right now,” added Rosenberg. “But not all change is for the best. It’s important to recognize what trends are beneficial in the long run and allow people to make the most efficient use of places and things they interact with.”

Rosenberg, who was born and raised in Saskatoon, Canada, spent nine years studying architecture and environmental design. He has traveled all over the world to study structures and cultures which inspire him. Rosenberg has earned Bachelor degrees in fine arts and environmental design in architecture, as well as a Master degree in architecture. When he was ready to bring his architectural influence back to the West, he headed straight for Los Angeles to open shop and start implementing his vision into action.

Currently, the team at M-Rad are working on projects around the globe, from apartment buildings in Los Angeles to a private members club in Philadelphia, to a boutique hotel in Taipei. They have created designs for mixed-use towers, luxury hotels, sports parks, and more.

About M-Rad Architecture

M-Rad’s mission is to revolutionize the architecture industry by creating bespoke solutions to universal problems. M-Rad’s unique, multi-faceted business model incorporates their work in every step of the development process; from design and building to marketing, branding, and products. Expanding their scope allows them to re-conceptualize architecture and urban growth through social and environmental research and provide cities the opportunity to thrive. For more information on the company and to view their business model visit: www.m-rad.com.

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San Diego Festival of Science & Engineering Celebrates 10th Anniversary with Expanded 2018 Expo Footprint and Festival Week Schedule

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San Diego Festival of Science & Engineering

March 3-11, 2018: Join more than 65,000 San Diegans for a week of innovation, creation at STEM-focused events; Expo Day features new Air Force Rapid Strike simulation experience; Festival Week brings ‘STEM in Your Backyard’ throughout San Diego County, and a special event for International Women’s Day

SAN DIEGO – Gather ‘round scientists and engineers, one of the largest STEM festivals in the U.S. is back and ready to “rocket”!

The organizers of the 10th annual San Diego Festival of Science & Engineering, presented by the Illumina Foundation, is preparing for its highly anticipated EXPO DAY before its traditional Festival Week. The festival, hosted by the Biocom Institute, once again begins with the family-favorite EXPO Day on Saturday, March 3, 2018 at PETCO Park. EXPO DAY is the official kick-off celebration for festival week featuring hundreds of exhibitors and gives attendees a major preview of what’s to come to area businesses, schools, libraries and museums throughout the county during Festival Week. EXPO DAY is free and open to the public. In 2017, the San Diego Festival of Science & Engineering’s EXPO DAY broke attendance records, hosting 26,143 children, parents and STEM enthusiasts.

After EXPO DAY the fun continues with Festival Week (March 4-11) – eight days of learning, hands-on activities, innovation, and behind-the-scenes opportunities for students in grades kindergarten through 12th grade, as well as adults and families to ignite their passion for STEM education. Many events are free and open to the public. More than 65,000 are expected to participate throughout the week visiting EXPO DAY and festival week events. Visit www.lovestemsd.org for festival week details.

Not only is the San Diego Festival of Science & Engineering’s EXPO DAY jam-packed with science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) activities, but Festival Week also features interactive demonstrations, hands-on activities and dynamic speakers to engage kids, adults and families in the importance of STEM education.

A program of the Biocom Institute and presented by Illumina Foundation, the San Diego Festival of Science & Engineering aims to encourage and engage kids in STEM, and to increase San Diego County’s reputation of being a leader in the science industry. By hosting events and activities throughout the region, the festival demonstrates how science and engineering opportunities are in our own “backyard,” and are for science lovers of all ages. In fact, the STEM in Your Backyard series will now be accessible in areas all over San Diego County, including Escondido, Chula Vista, Lakeside and Barrio Logan.

Additionally, festival organizers plan to bring back the all crowd-favorite 21 and up series for adult science and engineering enthusiasts to continue, and share their passion for STEM with others. STEM education never stops and adults have the same fascination with science, technology, engineering, and math as kids do. Festival organizers are putting the final touches on the series and more information will be announced in the New Year.

“We’re very excited for the 10th anniversary edition of the San Diego Festival of Science & Engineering, as we celebrate the history that brought us here along with our many long-standing partners and sponsors,” said Sara Pagano, managing director, Biocom Institute. “The week will represent a reflection into our past as well as a peak into the future of the Festival for years to come over the next decade.”

Sponsorships are available for the 2018 EXPO DAY and Festival Week. For more details, visit lovestemsd.org/become-sponsor.

Below is a preliminary list events hosted and organized by the San Diego Festival of Science & Engineering. The entire 2017 Festival Week schedule will be finalized in mid-January 2018 with additional venues hosting more than 60 events throughout the week for budding scientists and their families. Visit the festival website at www.lovestemsd.org for more information. Schedule subject to change.

EXPO DAY

Saturday, March 3, 2018

10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

PETCO Park

100 Park Blvd.

San Diego, CA 92101

Ticket Cost: FREE

Now in its 10th year, the San Diego Festival of Science & Engineering involves hundreds of businesses, corporations, sponsors, and nonprofits in a week-long celebration of STEM education in San Diego County. Presented by Illumina Foundation, EXPO DAY at Petco Park is the Festival’s signature event providing interactive, hands-on science, technology, engineering and math exhibits, and activities to budding K-12 science lovers. In 2017, more than 26,000 children, parents and STEM enthusiasts attended EXPO Day, and more than 65,000 people participated in festival week events. There will be an MVP Luncheon (registration required) at 11:30 a.m. TEDxKids@ElCajon will also be the premier feature all day on the Dugout Stage and for families, the Pre-K Zone is back again!

STEM In Your Backyard: Barrio Logan

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

3:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Logan Heights Branch Library

567 S 28th St.

San Diego, CA 92113

Join the San Diego Festival of Science & Engineering as we celebrate STEM in the Barrio Logan community! Bring your family to the Logan Height Branch Library for a FREE and fun filled day featuring over 25 interactive, hands-on exhibits from local businesses, nonprofits, and schools all meant to spark a love for science in your K-12 future innovator.

STEM In Your Backyard: South Bay

Friday, March 9, 2018

10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Castle Park High School

1395 Hilltop Dr.

Chula Vista, CA 91911

Join the San Diego Festival of Science & Engineering as we celebrate STEM in the South Bay community! Bring your family to Castle Park High School for a FREE and fun filled day featuring over 25 interactive, hands-on exhibits from local businesses, nonprofits, and schools all meant to spark a love for science in your K-12 future innovator.

NOTE: Additional STEM In Your Backyard venues in Escondido and Lakeside are in process of being confirmed.

About the San Diego Festival of Science & Engineering, San Diego

The mission of the San Diego Festival of Science and Engineering, San Diego is to engage kids in science and engineering. By doing this, the organization expands the general public’s understanding of the relevancy of science and engineering in everyday lives, illuminates why the United States must maintain its leadership role in science and technology, and work with parents and teachers to inspire today’s students to become tomorrow’s science, technology, engineering, and mathematical (STEM) innovators. For more information, visit http://www.lovestemsd.org or call 858-455-0300 ext. 4152. Connect on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/loveSTEMsd) and Twitter (@LoveSTEMsd).

About the Biocom Institute

The mission of the Biocom Institute is to support life science innovation and success in San Diego by providing our community with K-12 student and teacher STEM outreach, innovative industry-vetted professional development programs and key veteran focused mentorship and internship programs.  In pursuit of this mission, we support: mentorship that ensures diversity; science and technology information that mobilize communities; corporate social responsibility campaigns that strengthen the bottom line and a culture of collaboration that maximize resources. For more information, visit https://www.biocom.org/s/Biocom_Institute.

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