5 Great Tech And Engineering Internships For 2018

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An internship is a fantastic way to earn valuable experience in a given field while establishing a connection to an organization that might, at some point down the road, remember you when you’re in search of a full time job.

Vault.com, a career information hub that ranks companies and institutions as places to find professional happiness, recently published a list of great internships in the tech and engineering fields, for companies operating in industries from financial services to manufacturing.

To choose its roster of fantastic internships, Vault surveyed more than 400 companies on their internship programs.

It then had more than 12,000 current and former interns for these companies rank their programs on factors like compensation and perks, quality of life, application processes, career development, and the prospect of full time employment.

Within the category of tech and engineering, these were the internship programs that ranked highest…

Capital One Technology Internship Program

https://blogs-images.forbes.com/karstenstrauss/files/2017/11/Capital-One-Campus-Intern.jpg?width=960

Industry: Banking

Number of Interns: 101+

Compensation: Paid

Duration: 6 to 12 weeks

Academic Level: College Juniors, College Seniors, Graduate Students

Roles: Software Engineer, Data Engineer, Cyber Security Engineer

Advice From Interns: “Your experience can very greatly. I was lucky to get a prepared and helpful team, as well as work with 3 other interns. You may be placed onto a team who is less prepared and you may not work with any other interns. However, there are plenty of intern events to network and socialize outside of work.”

Owens Corning Internship

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Industry: Manufacturing

Number of Interns: 101+

Compensation: Paid, Stipend

Duration: 6 to 12 weeks

Academic Level: College Sophomores, College Juniors, College Seniors, Graduate Students, Business school students, Law school students

Advice From Interns: “The atmosphere and how everyone treats the interns very well. You aren’t looked at as an intern and more of as a real employee. It’s a 3 month interview for a the full time offer.”

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

November is National Scholarship Month NOW is the time to start applying for scholarships

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SALT LAKE CITY–TFS Scholarships is the most comprehensive free online resource for higher education funding connecting students to more than 7 million scholarships representing more than $41 billion in aid.

It was founded in 1987 after Richard Sorensen’s father, an inner-city high school principal, bemoaned the lack of good scholarship resources for his students.

High school seniors now applying for college should also be applying for scholarships, according to Richard Sorensen, an expert with more than 30 years experience helping students find scholarships.

“College bound students should spend four to five hours a week looking for scholarships, starting in the fall of their senior year,” says Sorensen, President of TFS Scholarships. “They should think about finding scholarships like it’s a part time job.”

A scholarship, unlike a student loan, is free money and should always be the first place students look for help in funding their college education. The majority of the scholarship opportunities featured on the TFS Scholarships website come directly from colleges and universities, rather than solely from competitive national pools, thereby increasing the chances of finding scholarships.

“There are new scholarships posted on the site every month, each with different deadlines and time frames,” says Sorensen. “There is plenty of aid out there and a lot of it goes untouched. If a student is diligent, they’ll find it.”

TFS Scholarships also posts a new scholarship opportunity every day on its Twitter, Facebook and Instagram social media accounts (@TFSscholarships), making it easy to find new scholarship opportunities. “We call it ‘The Scholarship of the Day,’” says Sorensen. “Most of the scholarships are available for all students so if a student or their parents follow us, they will have the opportunity to apply for more than 300 scholarships every year from this source alone.”

TFS takes it a step further, digging deeper into localized scholarships. “If you wanted to go to Arizona State, for example, we have scholarships specific to that school,” says Sorensen.

Each month TFS adds more than 5,000 new scholarships to its database in an effort to stay current with national scholarship growth rates – maximizing the number of opportunities students have to earn funding for their education.

Once students have their scholarships in hand, how they manage them can have important implications. It is up to the student to inform the school of the scholarship.

“The truth is, the money is going to be sent to the school in most cases,” says Sorensen. “If the money is going to tuition and books, it’s tax free. But it is taxable if they use it for living expenses. And if students get more money in scholarships than their direct expenses, they get the difference back from the school,” says Sorensen.

The TFS website also provides financial aid information, resources about federal and private student loan programs, and a Career Aptitude Quiz that helps students identify the degrees and professions that best fit their skills.

Thanks to the financial support of Wells Fargo, TFS has remained a free, online service that effectively connects students with college funding resources to fuel their academic future. “Students trust us with a lot of their personal information and we respect that,” says Sorensen. “With TFS, they never have to be worried about being bombarded by spam.”

For more information about Tuition Funding Sources visit tuitionfundingsources.com.

About TFS Scholarships

TFS Scholarships (TFS) is an independent service that provides free access to scholarship opportunities for aspiring and current undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. Founded in 1987, TFS began as a passion project to help students and has grown into the most comprehensive online resource for higher education funding. Today, TFS is a trusted place where students and families enjoy free access to more than 7 million scholarships representing more than $41 billion in college funding. In addition to its vast database that’s refreshed with 5,000 new scholarships every month, TFS also offers information about career planning, financial aid, and federal and private student loan programs as part of its commitment to helping students fund their future. Learn more at tuitionfundingsources.com.

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24 Companies Hiring Like Crazy in August

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diverse group of people at work in office meeting

The U.S. has approximately 6 million open jobs right now. That amounts to 6 million opportunities for you to land your dream job. Companies are desperate for top talent and are offering everything from free transportation to signing bonuses and even extra vacation days just to get your attention.

Here are a handful of hot companies hiring like crazy this month. Don’t let another day pass in a sub-par job. Embrace a new challenge and apply for a new job today!

What Some Employees Are Saying About Companies: “Innovative, fast-paced company that works hard to make the patient and employee experience a positive one.”

Booking.com

Where Hiring: Seattle, WA; New York, NY; Grand Rapids, MI; Los Angeles, CA & more.
What Roles: Site Reliability Engineer, Customer Service Guest Executive, Regional Recruitment Manager, Credit Controller, Marketing Manager, Account Manager, HR Business Partner, Freelance Photographer, Payroll Specialist & more.
What Employees Say: “Very good conditions, competitive salary, good bonus structure, insurance, healthcare etc.” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

Qualtrics

Where Hiring: Palo Alto, CA; Provo, UT; Dallas, TX; Seattle, WA & more.
What Roles: Content Marketing Manager, Senior Sales Engineer, Growth Leader, Email Marketing Manager, Senior DevOps Engineer, Customer Success Associate, Executive Assistant, Sales Training and Enablement, Product Specialist & more.
What Employees Say: “Free lunch practically every day, snacks everywhere, soft serve ice cream, and cookies on Fridays. Scooters, comfy couches, massage chairs, walking desks, and acres of beautiful gardens with strong WiFi to get work done in the shade of a tree. The benefits are unreal – 100% of health insurance premiums paid, 3% 401k contributions (even if you contribute $0), $2,500 a year into your HSA, 2 weeks of paternity leave, and $1,500 towards a vacation experience (on top of PTO).” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

BounceX

Where Hiring: New York, NY
What Roles: Director of Customer Success, Software Engineer, Technical Recruiter, Senior Product Manager, Senior Data Scientist, Client Partnerships Manager, Manager of Revenue & more.
What Employees Say: “Exciting time in the growth stage, considering we’re gearing up for IPO and working out the kinks related to scaling.” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

Lyft

Where Hiring: San Francisco, CA; Nashville, TN; New York, NY; Denver, CO; Chicago, IL & more
What Roles: Operations Manager, Customer Insights Analyst, Software Engineer, Data Scientist, Fleet Coordinator, Accountant, Product Marketing Manager, Embedded Software Lead, Technical Program Manager, Chief of Staff to the COO, Vehicle Engineer & more.
What Employees Say: “Employees value one another and work together as one team to accomplish goals and drive results as we support our internal and external customers. Work/life balance, great benefits, empowering culture, innovative and creative co-workers working alongside you – and the ability to truly partner to create and influence and leave your mark – just to name a few!” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

McGrath RentCorp

Where Hiring: Pasadena, TX; Livermore, CA; Charlotte, NC; Stockton, CA; Baltimore, MD; Dallas, TX; Auburndale, FL; South Plainfield, NJ & more.
What Roles: Class A Truck Driver, Purchasing Assistant, General Construction, Plumber, Manager of Accounting, Quality Control Inspector, Commercial Collections & more.
What Employees Say: “Great people, amazing culture, financially sound, opportunities to grow for those that want more.” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

ProHEALTH Care

Where Hiring: Great Neck, NY; Lake Success, NY; Mineola, NY & more.
What Roles: Office Manager, Urgent Care Medical Assistant, Receptionist, Nurse Practitioner, IT Manager, Regional Manager, Scheduler, Otolaryngologist, Optometrist & more.
What Employees Say: “Innovative, fast-paced company that works hard to make the patient and employee experience a positive one. A lot of opportunity and growth potential for staff. Significant company resources allow me and my staff to excel.” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

AppDynamics

Where Hiring: San Francisco, CA; Dallas, TX; Bengaluru, India; Sydney, Australia; Bracknell, England & more
What Roles: Product Manager, Customer Success Engineer, Staff Software Engineer, Senior Software Engineer, Enterprise Sales Representatives, Sales Engineers, Senior Product Marketing Manager, Senior Manager – Global Sales Compensation Operations & more.
What Employees Say: “AppDynamics is one of the fastest growing software companies of all time and is set to fly by its competitors in terms of revenue this year.” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

Milwaukee Tool

Where Hiring: Brookfield, WI; Greenwood, MS; Olive Branch, MS; Jackson, MS & more.
What Roles: Key Account Manager, Shipping Coordinator, General Labor, Team Lead, Network Engineer, Senior Project Engineer, DC Auditor, Demand Planner, Supply Planner, Human Resources Manager, Material Handler & more.
What Employees Say: “It is a fast-paced environment filled with a lot of young and talented people. The company has a positive long-term outlook and has continued to grow at a ridiculous pace offering new opportunities constantly.” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

LogMeIn

Where Hiring: Boston, MA; Orem, UT; Raleigh, NC; Tempe, AZ & more.
What Roles: Business Systems Analyst, Account Manager, Support Specialist, Inside Sales Representative, Resolutions Representative, Shipping & Receiving Clerk, Lead UX Designer, Staff Accountant & more.
What Employees Say: “LogMeIn is on an incredible journey. Each quarter the bar is raised and the growth and innovation continues to accelerate. Employees of all levels have plenty of opportunities to grow their skills and career. Bill Wagner is a world-class CEO and is focused and fearless.” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

WOW! Internet Cable and Phone

Where Hiring: Denver, CO; Tampa, FL; Knoxville, TN; Cleveland, OH; Augusta, GA & more.
What Roles: VP of Commercial Product, Business Operations Support Analyst, System Technician, Cable Installer, Billing Systems Analyst, Enterprise Account Executive, Residential Sales Consultant & more.
What Employees Say: “Strong culture founded on people serving people, inside and outside of the company.” —Former Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

Calm

Where Hiring: San Francisco, CA
What Roles: Data Analyst, Data Scientist, DevOps Engineer, Front-end Engineer, Mobile Engineer – iOS, Mobile Engineer – Android, Software Engineer – Data, Software Engineer – API, Head of Talent Acquisition, Director of Influencer Marketing, Head of Calm for Teams & more.
What Employees Say: “Great culture, mission-driven, incredibly successful, growing fast & perfect location.” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

Aegis Living

Where Hiring: Bellevue, WA; Pleasant Hill, CA; Seattle, WA; Redmond, WA; San Rafael, CA & more.
What Roles: Concierge, Driver, Wellness Nurse, Cook, Life Enrichment Assistant, Caregiver, Activities Assistant, Housekeeper, Bilingual Caregiver, Sales Director, Director of Operations & more.
What Employees Say: “I finally have a job where loving people is okay.” I have never felt so empowered and supported as I do at Aegis.” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

Glassdoor

Where Hiring: San Francisco, CA; London; Dublin; Mill Valley, CA; Chicago, IL & more.
What Roles: Customer Success Manager, Product Manager, Senior Enterprise Account Executive, Senior Manager of Engineering, HR Partner, Senior Java Engineer, Lead Product Growth Manager, Accounts Payable Specialist, Director of Jobs Product, Senior Product Designer & more.
What Employees Say: “We’ve been through a lot of changes in the last 12-14 months, but it finally feels like we’re getting into a groove. Our fearless leader has worked hard to make CS a great place to work throughout the company. He sets clear goals and executes.” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

Continue on to Glassdoor.com for the complete list

How Shavone Charles Created Her Dream Job In Tech

LinkedIn

Shavone Charles holds many titles. From being a musician and artist to her role as Head of Global Music and Youth Culture Communications at Instagram and recent founder of a passion project, Magic in Her Melanin, Charles is undoubtedly known to her peers and the surrounding tech and entertainment industries as being a renaissance woman and connoisseur of culture.

The term, “Do It For The Culture”, according to the Urban Dictionary, is a statement requesting that someone carry out a specific action for benefit of their shared culture. Charles is doing just that with not only her work in Silicon Valley but for black creatives globally. With her deep Trinidadian roots, Charles is passionate about maintaining her self-identity while creating an environment of inclusivity for women of color in tech.

Before she was trailblazing a new path for future generations, millennials and black women in tech, or creating her own job title at multi-billion dollar companies like Twitter and Instagram, she was a San Diego native and first-generation college graduate from UC Merced, just trying to figure it out. Upon graduating in 2012, Charles snagged several high-profile entertainment and communications based internships at Google, BET Networks, Capitol Hill and The Department of Justice. Her big break happened when she was the presented with the opportunity to create her own role and title at Twitter.

At Twitter, Shavone established her niche career focus on culture-focused communications and social marketing, business partnerships and data analysis with a close lens on music, online communities and youth culture. Upon joining the Twitter team, Shavone created her own role, as the first person to join her team and head up the company’s global music and culture communications, with a focus on data, often working on efforts tied music partnerships and high-priority product launches and acquisitions (including Vine and Periscope). During her time at Twitter, Shavone also remotely oversaw all of the company’s communications efforts for Brazil and Canada out of San Francisco and employed a number of successful global culture-driven communications programs tied to major entertainment and consumer moments in market (including Rock In Rio, Brazil’s Fashion Week, Juno Awards and more). She led content management and curation for the official @TwitterMusic account and helped grow it by over 5 million followers, as result of social campaigns with talent and highlighting the best uses of Twitter and Vine in music.

In addition to launching PR and social campaigns, Charles had the unique opportunity to create the first-ever employee resource group for African-American employees, aptly named Twitter BlackBirds. Her role at Twitter, catapulted her into a new realm of visibility and influence, leading her to head up communications and culture at Instagram. Charles has always been intrigued by the notion of connecting diverse groups of people through social media and cultivating an accepting community for people to have the choice to share commonalities.

Technology has allowed the culture to be seen on a global scale, with creatives now at the forefront of the movement and art form. It’s not a “niche” community anymore and people are using the internet to build a community around their interests,” which she said at Forbes I.D.E.A Summit.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

30-year-old Mareena Robinson Snowden is the first black woman to earn a PhD in nuclear engineering from MIT

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When Mareena Robinson Snowden walked across the commencement stage at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.) on June 8th, she became the first black woman to earn a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the storied university.

For her, there was one particular word that the experience brought to mind: grateful.

“Grateful for every part of this experience — highs and lows,” she wrote on Instagram. “Every person who supported me and those who didn’t. Grateful for a praying family, a husband who took on this challenge as his own, sisters who reminded me at every stage how powerful I am, friends who inspired me to fight harder. Grateful for the professors who fought for and against me. Every experience on this journey was necessary, and I’m better for it.”

Snowden’s Ph.D. was the culmination of 11 years of post-secondary study. But the 30-year-old tells CNBC Make It that a career in STEM wasn’t something she dreamed of as a child.

“Engineering definitely was not something I had a passion for at a young age,” she says. “I was quite the opposite. I think my earliest memories of math and science were definitely one of like nervousness and anxiety and just kind of an overall fear of the subject.”

She credits her high school math and physics teachers with helping to expand her interests beyond English and history, subjects she loved.

“I had this idea that I wasn’t good at math and they kind of helped to peel away that mindset,” she explains. “They showed me that it’s more of a growth situation, that you can develop an aptitude for this and you can develop a skill. It’s just like a muscle, and you have to work for it.”

When Snowden, who grew up in Miami, was in the 12th grade and studying physics, she and her dad were introduced to a friend of a friend who worked in the physics department at Florida A&M University. At the time, she says, she was considering colleges and decided to make a visit to the campus.

“We drove up there and it was amazing,” says Snowden. “They treated me like a football player who was getting recruited. They took me to the scholarship office, and they didn’t know anything about me at the time. All they knew was that I was a student who was open to the possibility of majoring in physics.”

Continue onto CNBC News to read the complete article.

Top 5 Highest Paying Government Jobs

LinkedIn
Woman Microbiologist

Government jobs offer stability, reasonably normal hours, many benefits and retirement packages. But, many people don’t realize that it offers are many high-paying jobs. See below for the top 5 jobs that pay a high salary.

1. Astronomer

Astronomy is a relatively small field, with about 6,000 professional astronomers in the United States. With a median annual salary of $108,681 a year, you can find them working for the Army, Air Force, and NASA.

2. Criminal Investigator

The projected growth rate for a criminal investigator is 18 percent. With an average base pay of $92,911 a year, criminal investigators work for the Department of Homeland Security, Department of Justice and the Army.

3. Microbiologist

Microbiologists earn an average of $87,500 a year, with an estimated increase of about 9 percent, and government agencies will be hiring about 8,000 new employees. Microbiologists can be found at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Agricultural Research Service, and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

4. Chaplain

This field is continuing to grow, and government chaplains earn an average $73,500 a year. You will find chaplains being hired at the Veterans Health Administration, Bureau of Prisons/Federal Prison System, Office Secretary Health and Human Services, and the National Institutes of Health.

5. Correctional Officer

Correctional officers on average make $47, 000 a year. A total of 26,000 new correctional officer jobs are expected to become available by 2020. Most of these are likely to be found at the Bureau of Prisons/Federal Prison System and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Most correctional officer jobs only require a high school diploma, but other employers, such as the U.S. Bureau of Prisons, require at least a bachelor’s degree.

Sources: glassdoor.com, financeandcareer.com, salary.com, federalpay.org

Stacy Brown-Philpot of TaskRabbit on Being a Black Woman in Silicon Valley

LinkedIn

The Detroit native studied at Penn and Stanford, worked for Goldman and Google, and now runs the gig economy pioneer that Ikea acquired in 2017.

Stacy Brown-Philpot didn’t grow up aspiring to be the chief executive of a technology company. Instead, she wanted to be an accountant.

While interning at an accounting firm in the 1990s, Ms. Brown-Philpot — who was raised by her mother in Detroit — worked for a partner who happened to be African-American. “I was like, ‘OK, there’s a black person who is a partner at this firm. This is something that I can accomplish.’”

But as Ms. Brown-Philpot acquired more experience and education, her ambitions grew, too. She graduated from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business in 1997, did a stint as an accountant at PricewaterhouseCoopers, then became an investment banker at Goldman Sachs in 1999.

She went back to college to get her graduate degree from Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business, then in 2003 joined Google, where Sheryl Sandberg became a mentor. At Google, Ms. Brown-Philpot assumed a series of leadership roles and founded the Black Googlers Network, an employee resource group.

After nine years at Google, she joined TaskRabbit — which lets people hire freelancers for odd jobs — as chief operating officer. She became chief executive in 2016, and last year, she sold the company to Ikea, the Swedish furniture giant.

This interview, which was condensed and edited for clarity, was conducted at TaskRabbit headquarters in San Francisco.

Tell me about your upbringing.

I grew up on the West Side of Detroit. My mom raised my brother and me by herself. We didn’t have a lot. My mother worked a job that didn’t pay a whole lot of money, so she had to make a lot of sacrifices. But she prioritized education. She would fall asleep helping us with our homework at night. She always taught us that no one can take your learning away from you. And with that, you can go anywhere and do anything.

So I focused on getting good grades. I wasn’t always a popular kid. I didn’t have the best clothes. But I was a smart kid. It’s cool to be smart in Silicon Valley. It’s not cool to be smart on the West Side of Detroit.

What was your first job?

I had a paper route with my brother. I would help him collect the money. I was like the C.F.O. of that operation, making sure we got paid.

And then you went to Penn.

I had no idea what an Ivy League school was. I was a fish out of water. My high school was 98 percent black. Penn was 6 percent black. So I had to find community. I had to figure out how was I going to succeed in this environment where most people don’t look like me, and don’t come from where I came from.

So where’d you find community?

There was a black college house. I didn’t live there. I would just go over there and spend time just sitting around with people that, you know, ate collard greens and fried chicken, just like I did growing up. It just made it safer for me and more confident for me to walk into a classroom and know I knew the answers and speak up.

Continue onto the New York Times to read the complete article.

How to prepare your kids for jobs that don’t exist yet

LinkedIn

Artificial Intelligence will rule the jobs of the future, so learning how to work with it will be key. But the skills needed might not be what you expect.

With total robot domination seemingly impending, preparing the next generation for the future of work can feel like a lost cause. But fear not, the future may be brighter than expected.

“There’s three job opportunities coming in the future,” says Avi Goldfarb, coauthor of Prediction Machines: The Simple Economics of Artificial IntelligenceHe divides them up into people who build artificial intelligence, people who tell the machines what to do and determine what to do with their output, and, finally, celebrities. This last category comprises actors, sports players, artists, writers, and other such luminaries surrounding the entertainment industry.

2017 report from Gartner concludes that artificial intelligence will create more jobs than it kills. In particular, the report singles out healthcare and education as areas ripe for growth. But the handling of artificial intelligence is where Goldfarb thinks an overwhelming number of those new jobs will be created. He thinks even human-centric positions in nursing and education will require a proficient understanding of artificially intelligent tools as the technology becomes a more routine facet of those jobs. For example, to assist with home healthcare for elderly populations, little robots have emerged to help patients remember to take their medications or go for a walk. These bots are still nascent, but it’s not hard to imagine a world in which nurses have to understand how to help patients set reminders or even be able to communicate with these devices remotely as a way of checking in on a patient as part of their jobs.

“The most valuable combinations of skills are going to be people who both have good training in computer science, who know how the machines work, but also understand the needs of society and the organization, and so have an understanding of humanities and social sciences,” he says. “That combination, already in the market, is where the biggest opportunities are.”

HUMANITIES

So how does one prepare to lead these artificially intelligent machines into the new world? Oddly enough, a liberal arts education might be the best antidote to automation, says Goldfarb. While he believes that most people will need a basic understanding of computer science, he thinks that studying art, philosophy, history, sociology, psychology, and neuroscience could be key to preparing for the future. These studies will help young people to have a broad range of knowledge that they can use to put artificial intelligence to its best use.

Experts who study the future of work agree that our ability to make sense of the world is our biggest asset in the wake of automation. While artificial intelligence is good at narrow, repetitive tasks, humans are good at coming up with creative solutions. Anything you can do to get your child thinking creatively will no doubt help prepare her for joining the working world.

Continue onto Fast Company to read the complete article.

Closing the Tech Diversity Gap

LinkedIn

The Align Master’s Program: a direct path to a master’s in computer science for non-computer science majors

By 2020, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates there will be more than one million job openings in technology fields that won’t be filled by the current pipeline of students.

America faces a serious shortage of high-tech workers, in part because today’s universities are not attracting enough women and underrepresented minority students into tech—or those undergraduates are self-selecting out of trying computer science. That’s where Northeastern University’s Align Master’s Program comes in.

Align focuses on closing the diversity gap in tech by providing students from any academic background a direct path to a master’s degree in computer science (CS). And now Northeastern has received philanthropic and corporate funding to expand the Align program. The funding will pay for the first semester of study for women and underrepresented minorities—a critical step toward removing economic barriers and ensuring degree completion.

“First-semester scholarships are an incredibly effective way to recruit people who might not otherwise try computer science,” said Carla Brodley, dean of Northeastern’s College of Computer and Information Science. “For students who choose to go on to the second semester, the completion rate is 95 percent to date.”

Align is designed for non-CS majors and people without programming experience, and it has a unique structure that is more similar to a medical or law degree than a traditional CS master’s program. The program starts with rigorous academic bridge courses to prepare students for graduate-level study in computer science. Students also gain real world work experience through a paid co-op or internship that lasts six to eight months. Northeastern has a global network of more than 3,000 employer partners, including more than 500 technology companies.

Amber WatsonPiloted at Northeastern’s Seattle campus, Align is also available at the university’s Boston, Charlotte, and Silicon Valley campuses. The program is typically completed in two and a half years, with classes offered in the evenings year-round. This flexibility is key for many Align students who are working professionals.

“I work full time, and my job is really more than 40 hours per week. I also have a child and commute to Boston every day—yet Align is still possible,” says current student to get a second bachelor’s degree, but now I can get a master’s-level education.”

By 2022, Northeastern’s goal is to graduate 1,000 students annually from the Align program—50 percent women and 25 percent underrepresented minority students. Recent program graduates include a student who studied chemistry as an undergrad, and after earning her master’s in computer science, now works for a major pharmaceutical company. Another majored in English and was offered a technical writing job at a top technology firm upon program completion. Another studied philosophy before enrolling in Align—she now works at a nonprofit institute conducting research on artificial intelligence.

“We’ve proven that the model makes sense, that it works, and now we’re ready to scale it to solve a workforce development problem—but more importantly, a problem of social equity and inclusion,” explains Brodley.

The Align Master’s Program is built for people with diverse perspectives and experience who are looking to break into technology, equipping those students with the knowledge and practical skills needed to succeed. Students like Andrew Dickens, who earned both a bachelor’s and an MBA degree in business, spent several years in the U.S. Air Force, and graduated with his master’s in computer science in 2017. Dickens now works at Amazon as a Software Development Engineer and also teaches one of the program’s introductory courses at the Seattle campus.

“When I started, I couldn’t write a line of code. I’d never heard of Python, seen Java, or even opened a terminal on my laptop,” he says. “Align allowed me to bridge that gap in knowledge—to learn and grow at my pace—and come out with a master’s in computer science.”

Learn more about Northeastern University’s Align Master’s Program: align.ccis.northeastern.edu

Northeastern

Manufacturing: A High-Paying ‘New Collar’ Career

LinkedIn
Women in Manufacturing

We’ve heard of white collar jobs and blue collar jobs, but “new collar” jobs? There’s a new trend in employment, and it’s in career fields that don’t necessarily require a college degree but require a specific set of highly technical skills.

In manufacturing, there is a tremendous opportunity for new collar workers to be well paid as they fill hundreds of thousands of vacancies. And the time to take advantage of this opportunity is now.

“Today in America, manufacturers need to fill some 364,000 jobs. Over the next 7 to 8 years, we’ll need to fill around 3.5 million, according to a study from Deloitte and the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) Manufacturing Institute,” says NAM President and CEO Jay Timmons. “But two million of those jobs could go unfilled because we haven’t upskilled enough workers.”

IBM CEO Ginni Rometty was the first to urge politicians and business leaders to not think in terms of white or blue collar jobs, but to broadly consider these future unfilled positions as “new collar” jobs—jobs that don’t require a traditional 4-year degree but do require a good amount of skill. Manufacturing is a great new collar career choice, and here’s why.

Well paying positions. According to the National Tooling & Machining Association (NTMA), those in a manufacturing-related job in America tend to make an average of $15,000 more per year than other job fields. This extra amount of money alone can pay for rent, a new car, or help to significantly pay off school or other related debts, while still having money left over each year. More money for vacations, or saving to get to retirement faster.

Flexible work environment with a changing technological and social landscape. Machinist jobs are well known to have a casual dress code, which is usually comprised of thick t-shirts, jeans and hoodies, due to the work environments they expose themselves to. There are also lots of young machinists working today who have tattoos, piercings, and an overall unconventional look, which is completely fine with most manufacturing shop floor employers.

There is also the flexibility in being able to bring these skills to any manufacturing shop floor.

With the industry getting younger, it is also easier for people in this job field to not only find their niche community within the realm social media, but for employers to reach new talent via the platforms of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and beyond.

Less time in school after high school, and you can often learn the trade during high school. While there is a serious need of resources for STEM learning (science, tech, engineering and math) for youth these days, there are some resources that can be highlighted as great examples.

For any classroom environment, it is highly recommended that educators check out the video platform called Edge Factor, which has an abundance of resources to let young people discover what they would like about working in this industry. There is also the Cardinal Manufacturing program from the Eleva-Strum School District – it’s a real machine shop high school kids can work in, and that school district also has a very progressive Digital Learning Initiative to keep these kids up to pace with current technology.

The great news is that to get a job in the manufacturing field working at a machine, a college degree is not necessary. Most employers will look for certifications, or may even offer an apprenticeship, to get new talent through the door. To gain certifications, there are online colleges, community colleges, and even vendors who offer these valuable certification learning resources, as well as the program Workshops for Warriors for military veterans.

Source: monster.com; Alliance for American Manufacturing; nam.org

How Vimeo’s 34-Year-Old CEO Mastered The Nonlinear Career Path

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The gifts of the digital age are wildly abundant. We have in our pockets the ability to teach ourselves anything, meet people and build communities across the globe and an endless market for goods and services. This level of access and freedom means you don’t have to follow a traditional career path, but when you are thinking about designing your own, whether right out of college or during a career pivot, this unlimited possibility can be totally overwhelming. It’s the paradox of choice.

“You don’t have to follow a traditional career path. There’s no rule book or playbook for success. Write your own roles. Don’t take people’s paths as the way that you have to do things. You have to do it yourself.”

This is Anjali Sud’s advice for us. And as Vimeo’s CEO at 34, she is undoubtedly the master of the non-linear career. “I did everything from investment banking to being a toy buyer to marketing diapers online to coming to Vimeo to do marketing and finding myself in my dream job now as the CEO.”

But how do you create a strategy for building a non-linear career without a playbook? And, how do you advocate for your work when you’re new to a field or if you have the skills but not the experience? I sat down with Anjali Sud at Collision in New Orleans to learn about her journey to the C-Suite and what she’s learned along the way.

When you started your career, did you see your path as non-linear? How did this shift for you over time?

I wish I had known that careers aren’t linear. When you’re young and in school, you work so hard and there is sort of a linear path. You know? You find a major and you specialize in it, you try to get a job. And then when you get out in the workforce, there can sometimes be this pressure — especially when you look at people around you. I remember, right out of college, I wanted to be an investment banker and I couldn’t get a job at a big bank. I got rejected by every big bank. And so you start to feel like, “If I don’t get the job at Goldman Sachs, I’ll never be able to become an operator and do what I want to do.” When I look back at my career path it was incredibly not linear. I wish I had known that so I wouldn’t stress out so much about not having a perfect path or not getting that job interview. Instead, having the faith that you can affect your career path at any point and realizing that opportunities come from places you could never imagine. I wish I had known that. I think I would have been more chill.

When you realized you wanted to transition from finance into operations, you hit a couple of walls — namely companies who didn’t want to give you a shot without this experience. How did you navigate this and end up as an operator at Amazon?

I met with a bunch of startups in NYC and asked them what skill sets they thought were most transferable between finance and operations. One recommendation I got was to try business development as a good “transition” function. The reason is that business development often requires deal-making skills – something I had picked up in finance – but it also involves a deep operational understanding of the business and its growth strategy. So, I applied for a summer internship at Amazon in business development. I worked my butt off that summer and got a full-time offer to join the business development team, but instead asked to take on an operational role. Because I had gotten my foot in the door and proved myself, Amazon was willing to give me a shot as an operator, first in a merchandising role, and then in marketing.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.