The man behind some of America’s most recognisable logos, Ivan Chermayeff, has died

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Ivan Chermayeff mightn’t have been a household name, but his work certainly was.

Born in London, the American graphic designer died on Saturday, aged 85. With a career spanning six decades, Chermayeff’s legacy varies between poster art, illustration, sculpture and collage.

It’s his logo designs, however, that people all over the world will instantly recognize.

In 1957, Chermayeff set up a design firm alongside collaborator Tom Geismar, where they designed graphic identities for a range of governmental and commercial organizations.

Chermayeff designed now iconic logos for Showtime, HarperCollins, the Smithsonian Institution, Pan Am and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles.

His firm, now named Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv, was behind the design of logos for Mobil, Chase Bank, NBC, National Geographic, PBS, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Museum of Modern Art, and numerous others. It’s safe to say you’ve come across their work.

“Ivan was a brilliant designer and illustrator, with a vibrant personal style that reflected joy, intelligence and wit,” Geismar said in a statement.

“He loved surprise, large-scale objects, and the color red. For over 60 years, Ivan and I have enjoyed a partnership, to which we each brought complimentary talents, in an alliance cemented by shared values and mutual respect. Ivan’s contribution to the field of design will remain unsurpassed.”

Chermayeff and his collaborators are significantly responsible for what corporate America looks like today, with simple and effective images that stand the test of time.

“There are different answers as to what makes a good logo,” Chermayeff said in a interview at the University of Texas at Arlington in 2015.

“They should be very simple. Appropriate for the audience. It is usually a two month process to get to that point but it should look like it took five minutes. It has to be understandable and hold its own.”

Continue onto Mashable to read the complete article.

Octavia E. Butler, Who Brought Diversity to the World of Science Fiction, Honored With Google Doodle

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Octavia Butler

Octavia E. Butler, a groundbreaking African-American science fiction writer who would have turned 71 on Friday, was honored with a Google Doodle that celebrates her contributions to the literary world.

Butler was one of the first writers in science fiction — traditionally dominated by white male authors — to include diverse protagonists in her stories, and was widely admired for evocatively exploring hierarchies and human flaws in her work.

Butler died in 2006, but her family released a statement to coincide with Friday’s Google Doodle that paid tribute to her legacy.

“Her spirit of generosity and compassion compelled her to support the disenfranchised,” her family said in a statement. “She sought to speak truth to power, challenge prevailing notions and stereotypes, and empower people striving for better lives. Although we miss her, we celebrate the rich life she led and its magnitude in meaning.”

Throughout her life, Butler won various awards and became the first science-fiction author to get the MacArthur Fellowship. Here’s what you need to know about her prestigious career:

Nebula and Hugo awards

Butler won two Nebula awards and two Hugo awards in her career, two of the most prestigious prizes in science fiction. Two of those awards were for the same short story, Bloodchild, in which human refugees are imprisoned on an alien planet by insect-like creatures that protect them while using them as hosts to breed their young. Butler insisted the story was not an allegory for slavery while critics applauded it for reversing gender roles and examining the complex structures of oppression.

MacArthur Fellowship

In 1995, Butler became the first science-fiction author to be awarded the prestigious MacArthur Fellowship. The award came with a prize of $295,000. The foundation said Butler’s “imaginative stories are transcendent fables, which have as much to do with the future as with the present and the past.”

Television adaptation of Butler’s book

Last year, it was announced that Ava DuVernay, who recently directed A Wrinkle In Time, would be adapting Butler’s book, Dawn, into a television series. It is not clear what network will pick up the show just yet.

Read the complete article and more at TIME Magazine.

Black Panther: Movie to Movement

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TChalla

By Mackenna Cummings

Last June, the trailer teaser for Marvel’s Black Panther—not even the full trailer—racked up 89 million views in 24 hours. Twitter called it one of the most tweeted-about films of 2017, though it wouldn’t open until February 2018, with hashtags #BlackPantherSoLit and #WelcomeToWakanda. The Boys & Girls Club of Harlem held a fund-raiser to arrange a private screening, others planned viewing parties. It was a sign of things to come.

This year, Black Panther is shattering box office records as the third highest grossing film in the country, bringing in almost $700 million in its first 10 weeks in theaters. Essentially a stand-alone movie in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, it broke the opening weekend record for a non-sequel/prequel, earning $202 million its first week out. That number also gave Black Panther the new record for a solo superhero week one debut, topping the $174 million opening weekend of Iron Man 3.

Marvel Comics’s character Black Panther was originally conceived in 1966 by creators Stan Lee and Jack Kirby as a way to give black readers a character to identify with. The movie Black Panther tells the story of young T’Challa, who, after the death of his father, the king of Wakanda, returns home to the isolated high-tech African nation to succeed to the throne and take his rightful place as king. But when a powerful enemy reappears, T’Challa’s strength and authority as king—and Black Panther—is tested when he’s drawn into a dire conflict that puts the fate of Wakanda and the entire world at risk. T’Challa must release the full power of Black Panther to defeat his foes and secure the safety of his people and their way of life.

“It’s the first time in a very long time that we’re seeing a film with centered black people, where we have a lot of agency,” says Jamie Broadnax, the founder of Black Girl Nerds, a pop-culture site focused on sci-fi and comic-book fandoms, in an interview with the New York Times. These characters, she notes, “are rulers of a kingdom, inventors and creators of advanced technology. We’re not dealing with black pain, and black suffering, and black poverty.”

Marvel Studios’ BLACK PANTHER..Shuri (Letitia Wright)..Ph: Film Frame..©Marvel Studios 2018

Letitia Wright, who plays Shuri in the movie, hopes that it inspires young girls to pursue STEM, especially considering that women of color currently make up less than 10 percent of the working scientists and engineers in the United States.

The impact of the movie is not limited to inspiration. To celebrate the success of the film, Disney donated $1 million to the Boys and Girls Clubs of America for the STEM education programs. Through these programs, children have access to technology like 3D printers, robotics, and high definition film equipment, similar to the tech used to create the movie.

The film is giving minorities a platform to not only be included in STEM but to be STEM leaders. It is building upon a movement that so many others are contributing to and highlighting their work. According to a study done by the National Science Foundation (NSF), a sense of belonging is key to retention for minorities in STEM. Underrepresented groups need to feel that they belong in their STEM courses and workplace to stay in it and Black Panther is getting to the core of that by representing a woman of color as the leader of STEM in a technologically driven nation. Below are ten movements and movers that, like Black Panther, are impacting underrepresented groups in STEM every day.

Individuals and STEM

LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 14: CEO Black Girls Code Kimberly Bryant (Photo by Jeff Vespa/Getty Images for Glamour)

Kimberly Bryant, a successful engineer, started a movement in 2011 that has now impacted thousands of young girls. When Bryant started her career as a computer engineer, she was one of few women let alone persons of color in her courses. But, years later, when her own daughter pursued STEM at a summer camp, she was amazed to find the classroom unchanged in representation. Inspired by this revelation, she began teaching her daughter and daughter’s friends to code, which led her to launch Black Girls Code. The nonprofit now has chapters across the nation and outside of the U.S. and continues to impact the lives of young black girls by giving them access to computer science education.

Dr. Mae Jemison, the first African-American woman in space, has paved the way for young women of color to pursue their dream of being an astronaut. But she is not only leading by example. Jemison co-founded, along with her siblings, The Dorothy Jemison Foundation for Excellence, in honor of their late mother. The foundation assists in bettering education for STEM and has several programs that promote scientific literacy for students and teamwork and problem-solving.

Jamie Bracey, the Director of STEM Education, Outreach, and Research for Temple University, is working hard to help foster STEM education not only across the United States but also in her home state of Pennsylvania. She was inspired to start a movement after seeing so many students from local communities struggle because of the lack of education and support. In partnership with programs like the Pennsylvania Mathematics Engineering Science Achievement, she works to foster interest in STEM fields and education in middle and high school students. Recently, Bracey decided she needed to do more. Earlier this year, she helped launch the Center for Inclusive Competitiveness at Temple University. This center will serve as a collaborative STEM outreach program supporting underserved communities.

Dr. Anna Powers is empowering young women in their pursuit of STEM through her Powers Education program. While teaching at a university, Powers saw many women discouraged in STEM because their confidence was diminished—they didn’t believe they could succeed. Because of this, Powers Education revolves around building the confidence of women in science by teaching science through intuition over memorization. Powers also emphasizes that failure is part of the path to success, helping women not be discouraged but empowered by taking risks and trying again.

Corlis Murray is a leading engineer for Abbott, but when she pursued her career the majority of her community did not understand the field she was entering. Now, she is role model for other young women of color hoping to break into a field that is still typically male. Murray believes that one of the best ways for the lack of diversity in STEM to change is for companies to invest in these underrepresented communities to provide access to education and opportunities. With Abbott, Murray launched their high school STEM internship program, because she feels it is her job to care and help where she has the option to. She has created a movement from her success and love of STEM.

Marvel Studios’ BLACK PANTHER..L to R: Okoye (Danai Gurira), T’Challa/Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman), Nakia (Lupita Nyong’o) and Ayo (Florence Kasumba)..Photo: Matt Kennedy..©Marvel Studios 2018

Education and STEM

Cal Poly Pomona’s Femineer movement is connecting schools and high school girls to STEM. The program, founded at the university, so far has been able to provide 41 K–12 schools with access to STEM curriculums and female engineer mentors to inspire more women to pursue STEM. This is a movement that makes other movements, because participating schools like Ramona High School in Ramona, California, have not let the Femineer program end with their high school participants. Femineers at Ramona High have taken what they have learned and gone to the kindergarten classes to inspire young woman to pursue STEM.

Companies and STEM

Over the next five years, Verizon will be donating $400 million to 200 middle school STEM programs. Their goal is to give five million students access to free STEM education, technology, and teacher training. Schools will be selected through public nominations on social media using the hashtag #humanability. CEO Lowell McAdam said in a statement, “Our mission, which we call Humanability, is to give people the ability to do more in this world—that’s why it’s paramount we invest to give kids the technology education and resources they need to succeed.” By the year 2020, millions of students across the nation will experience the effects of Verizon’s humanibility.

Ford Motor Companies also believes the way to change is to invest in underrepresented communities. They have invested over $63 million in STEM programs for kids. Their STEAM Experience is one of these programs impacting education. Last year STEAM Experience allowed young women in the Detroit area to show off their quick thinking and innovative scientific skills by creating problem-solving inventions out of recycled materials. They are showing these young women that there is more to the field than meets the eye.

When discussing the impact, Alison Bazil, Ford’s business manager for vehicle components and system engineering, said, “It isn’t just about being good at math and science. If you like to be creative and inventive, solve problems and make things better, that’s really what engineering is all about.” The STEAM Experience Program is not only giving access to education but also opening the girls up to an opportunity they may have never before considered.

Organizations and STEM

The Society for the Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) is building the community of Hispanics and Native Americans in STEM through its programs such as Chapter Leadership Institute (CLI) and annual conference. CLI connects local university students and gives them leadership skills that have allowed many to go back into their community and continue the movement. One CLI alum is helping first-generation students pursue a graduate education. The chapters also connect with each other to increase the impact on both schools positively.

Society of Women Engineers (SWE) not only hosts an annual conference to connect women engineers but also hosts an annual event called Invent It. Build It. This event supports girls from 6th to 12th grades, parents, and educators to engage with STEM and connect with resources and opportunities. The event moves locations to allow girls across the nation to access the event and continue to grow in STEM. One of the best aspects of the event is that it not only educates and engages these girls, but they also get to see what real-life opportunities are available for someone in an engineering career.

“Girls often do not associate engineering as a career path that allows them to help people, and they also lack confidence in STEM skills as compared to their male counterparts. Events like Invent it. Build it. are essential to show girls what an engineer looks like and instill the confidence that they, too, can be an engineer.”

Marvel Studios’ BLACK PANTHER..Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman)..Ph: Film Frame..©Marvel Studios 2018

For diversity to continue to grow in STEM, movers and movements such as these are crucial. Women and minorities need representation on and off the screen, as well as access to STEM education for these movements to continue to make strides. The stories above are just a few examples of the incredible things happening in the world of STEM, made possible because these STEM leaders took it upon themselves to make a difference and join the movement.

Ready for one more statistic on director Ryan Coogler’s wildly successful movie? Black Panther’s crushing $202 million first weekend was the biggest opening ever for any movie directed or produced by a person of color. It easily beat out James Wan’s Furious 7, the 2015 action film with a diverse cast that earned $147 million its first weekend. May this victory be a sign of more box office magic to come from filmmakers from all backgrounds.

Alcatraz East Awards Graffiti Artists

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Graffiti Artist

It’s not often that graffiti artists get recognized and awarded for their artistic talents. But on June 2, 2018 that’s exactly what Alcatraz East Crime Museum did, holding a graffiti art contest giving the winners the opportunity to have their work on display at the museum for thousands of visitors to see. This first graffiti contest held by the museum featured seven pre-selected artists who also competed for cash prizes.

“We are excited with how our first outdoor event and first art contest went off,” says Rachael Penman, director of artifacts & exhibits at Alcatraz East. “It was a fun way to bring awareness to the public and give artists an opportunity to display their work in a museum setting.”

The top spots went to: 
1st place: Steve Hall of Maryville, TN
2nd place: Casey McKinney of Louisville, KY
3rd place: William Love of Nashville, TN

In addition to the local area, artists from Kentucky, South Carolina, and Georgia also competed. The contest guidelines restricted the artistic themes to be suitable for a general public audience, and in line with the museum’s law enforcement and crime history topics. Winners of the contest will have their panels displayed in the museum later this summer, and received cash prizes of $750 for first place, $350 for second place, and $200 for third place.

2nd place: Casey McKinney of Louisville, KY

The judges’ panel included local law enforcement representatives Sevier County Sheriff Ron “Hoss” Seals and Pigeon Forge Chief of Police Richard Catlett, as well as artist Kelly Sullivan from Arrowmont School for Arts and Crafts in Gatlinburg, and Rhonda Marsh, owner of Southern Draw Tattoo Studio in Pigeon Forge.

“This has been such a magical experience for me and I hope to see more events like this in the future,” shared William Love, one of the graffiti artist winners.”

The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that the national cost associated with removing graffiti from vandalized properties is at least $8 billion per year, between clean up and the lowering of property values. To combat this costly problem, many cities have introduced organized graffiti art projects to revitalize areas and provide official recognition to artists. Museum visitors will be able to see the graffiti exhibit to learn more about the topic and admire the artistic work on display.

“Based on the success of this year’s contest, we are planning to stage the event again next year,” added Penman. “We will start accepting artist applications on our website in January 2019.”

The Alcatraz East Crime Museum is located at the entrance to The Island, at 2757 Parkway in Pigeon Forge. They are located near the Margaritaville Hotel and Paula Deen’s Family Kitchen. The museum offers a wide array of crime information, including notorious crimes and criminals, historic artifacts, interactive exhibits, crime scene investigation, crime detection and fighting, and information on how help avoid being a victim of crime. There are also many activities that are kid friendly. Currently, the OJ Simpson white chase Bronco is on display at the museum, along with Ted Bundy’s VW Beetle.

3rd place: William Love of Nashville, TN

General admission tickets are $14.95 for children, $24.95 for adults. Group ticket sales are available. The museum will be open 365 days per year, from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., with the last ticket sold 60 minutes before closing. For more information and to purchase tickets, log online: www.alcatrazeast.com.

About Alcatraz East
Alcatraz East is the most arresting crime museum in the United States. Guests of all ages can encounter a unique journey into the history of American crime, crime solving, and our justice system. Through interactive exhibits and original artifacts, Alcatraz East is an entertaining and educational experience for all ages – so much fun it’s a crime! This family attraction is located at the entrance of The Island, located at 2757 Parkway, Pigeon Forge, TN. For more information, visit www.alcatrazeast.com

North Face is cutting waste by selling refurbished old coats

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To try to create more of a circular economy in the fashion industry, the outdoor gear company is launching a new line called Renewed, made up of old garments cleaned up so well that they’re like new.

If you buy a jacket from a just-launched pilot collection from The North Face, someone else might have already climbed a mountain or run a marathon in it. Called The North Face Renewed, the products are sourced from returns or defective items, cleaned and repaired to the quality of a new piece of clothing, and then sold online at a discount, as part of the company’s move toward a more circular business model.

“It just represents a really important next step in the evolution of our overall business,” says Tim Bantle, a general manager and vice president of lifestyle brands at The North Face. The company recognizes the apparel industry’s waste problem: 85% of textiles end up in a landfill. Even though the company makes products that are designed to last longer than average–items come with a lifetime guarantee, and the company offers repairs–it still had an opportunity to curb waste. Patagonia sells refurbished clothing through a similar online store.

During the new collection’s pilot phase, lasting from June through September, products will come from The North Face’s internal stock, including products that might have been returned under the company’s guarantee. A partner called The Renewal Workshop will professionally clean and restore items so they can be sold online.

Bantle argues that it especially makes sense to prolong the life of complex products like outdoor gear. “Oftentimes, when we think about designing an outerwear product, it really is more like designing a car than it is like designing a T-shirt in terms of the complexity of engineering and the kind of care that goes into the design and development of the product and testing,” he says. “When you’re building the quality of products that we are, but you’re only assuming one life for that, you’re really short-changing all of the work that you’re doing in terms of the design and development process.”

It’s already possible, of course, to find used North Face products on eBay or other resale sites. But the products in the new collection will be restored to like-new quality. The company thinks that it might begin to shift how their customers shop. “How many customers do we have today that might be full-price customers, that might actually buy Renewed product in the future instead?” says Bantle. Other customers, who might not have been able to afford the brand’s high prices in the past, might start buying the products for the first time.

Continue onto FastCompany to read the complete article.

The Secrets to Success: Incredible career insights from some of the world’s leading creatives

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Boniface-Mwangi

Learning from experienced artists, designers and photographers to understand how they achieve their goals should be part of every creative’s journey. We have to seek inspiration and ideas from those we admire if we’re ever going to get ahead.

These are the people who have already enjoyed lots of success and continue to be creative today – some who started their first business at aged eight years old while others are well past the typical retirement age. I guess when you choose creativity as a life-long passion, you never really stop working. Why would you, if you’re doing something you love?

So how have these established creatives managed to “make it”? What have been the secrets to their success? And what can we learn from them? We’ve rounded up some of the most inspiring and motivational talks and interviews to share incredible insights from some of the industry’s best.

1. Success, failure and the drive to keep creating – Elizabeth Gilbert

Elizabeth Gilbert

Author Elizabeth Gilbert was once an “unpublished diner waitress”, devastated by rejection letters. And yet, in the wake of the success of her best-selling book Eat, Pray, Love, she found herself identifying strongly with her former self. With beautiful insight, Gilbert reflects on why success can be as disorienting as failure and offers a simple, though hard, way to carry on, regardless of outcomes.

2. How to build your creative confidence – David Kelley

David Kelley

Creativity is not a domain of only a chosen few, according to David Kelley – founder of IDEO. And it shouldn’t be something that’s divided between “creatives” versus “practical” people. Telling stories from his legendary design career and his own life, he offers ways to build confidence to create.

3. Stop searching for your passion – Terri Trespicio

Branding strategist Terri Trespicio says there’s a lot of weight behind the age-old question, what are you passionate about? We’re constantly told these five words hold the key to a successful career and life purpose. Terri ponders, what if it’s the wrong question altogether? This inspiring talk turns the ubiquitous “find your passion” message on its ear.

4. Discoveries in Colour: The art of Carlos Cruz-Diez

Carlos Cruz-Diez

Carlos Cruz-Diez is a world-renowned artist and one of the greatest living figures in kinetic and op art. He creates interactive, immersive works that invite viewers to reconsider how they perceive the world – and at 94 years old, he continues to evolve as an artist, employing the newest digital technology in his Paris atelier, where he works with his children, his grandchildren, and a team of craftspeople who help bring his ideas to life. Watch the film below to understand how he has become one of the most influential modern thinkers in the realm of colour.

5. Maya Penn: Meet a young entrepreneur, cartoonist and activist

Maya Penn

Maya Penn started her first company when she was just eight years old, and thinks deeply about how to be responsible both to her customers and to the planet. She shares her story, and some animations, and some designs, and some infectious energy, in this charming talk. Hopefully, it will inspire you to launch your own business, find a different career path or start a fun side project.

6. A journey through the mind of an artist – Dustin Yellin

Dustin Yellin

Dustin Yellin makes mesmerising artwork that tells complex, myth-inspired stories. How did he develop his style? In this disarming talk, he shares the journey of an artist, starting from age eight, and his idiosyncratic way of thinking and seeing. Follow the path that leads him up to his latest major work, and be inspired by his journey so far.

7. The day I stood up alone – Boniface Mwangi

Boniface Mwangi

Photographer Boniface Mwangi wanted to protest against corruption in his home country of Kenya. So he made a plan: he and some friends would stand up and heckle during a public mass meeting. But when the moment came… he stood alone. What happened next, he says, showed him who he truly was. As he says, “There are two most powerful days in your life. The day you are born, and the day you discover why.” Be warned, there are graphic images in the following talk.

8. The art of creativity – Taika Waititi

Taika Waititi

Taika Waititi is a visual artist, actor, writer and film director hailing from New Zealand. His short film Two Cars, One Night was nominated for an Academy Award in 2005. Taika’s second feature, Boy, appeared at the Sundance and Berlin Film Festivals in 2010 and, more recently, his Hunt for the Wilderpeople enjoyed huge global success. In this classic TED Talk, he discusses how creativity has helped him to express his ideas and led him to where he is today.

“From the art & design magazine, Creative Boom.”

Alcatraz East Crime Museum Invites Graffiti Artists to Compete

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graffiti-art-contest

PIGEON FORGE, Tennessee (April 24, 2018) – It’s considered to be a crime and it has been said that graffiti is everyone’s problem. It’s an eyesore that typically brings property values down and costs a lot to clean up.

In fact, it’s estimated by the Environmental Protection Agency that the national cost associated with graffiti across the country is at least $8 billion per year. To combat this costly problem, many cities have introduced organized graffiti art areas and in some instances commission graffiti murals to “problem” vandal areas. In Knoxville, Tenn., there is a graffiti walking tour of murals that give an insight into the cities rich history. Now, in an effort to raise awareness, Alcatraz East Crime Museum will be hosting their 1st Annual Graffiti Art Contest, and they are inviting artists to participate.

“Graffiti is a serious issue that cities around the country deal with on a daily basis,” states Janine Vaccarello, chief operating officer for Alcatraz East. “We want people to understand how costly vandalism is and raise awareness on programs that provide a solution.”

The graffiti contest will be held at the Alcatraz East Crime Museum, located at 2757 Parkway, Pigeon Forge, on Saturday, June 2, 2018. The winning artists will have their work on display in the museum, helping to teach patrons about the topic.

Those artists who would like to participate must submit their samples to pre-qualify for the event date. Winners of the graffiti contest win bragging rights, will have their work displayed in the museum, and will win a cash prize. The prizes are $750 for first place, $350 for second place, and $200 for third place. Artists must be at least 18, the artwork must be a crime-related subject, and it’s only open to individuals, not teams. Artists can pre-qualify online at: alcatrazeast.com/graffiti-contest/.

“We are excited about this event and look forward to showcasing the winning artwork,” added Vaccarello. “Our exhibit will create conversations about graffiti, which is something that is found from coast to coast. If our exhibit influences any young minds which prevents future vandalism- then we have done our job!”

The museum also recently added new exhibits and artifacts, with there being something for everyone. Their new interactive exhibits give people the ability to test their pirate skills at tying knots, gives people the ability to share their own 9/11 experiences, and gives them the chance to offer a thank you message to law enforcement departments around the nation. One of the most popular items on display at the museum is the O.J. Simpson white Bronco from the infamous police chase that unfolded on television before millions of viewers.

The museum continues to add to their collection monthly and has a star-studded panel of experts who make up the Advisory Board, including those in law enforcement, collectors, a medical examiner, crime scene investigators, and others. The board includes Jim Willett, a retired prison warden, Anthony Rivera, a combat veteran and Navy SEAL chief, and Judge Belvin Perry, Jr., who is best known for the Casey Anthony trial. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit: alcatrazeast.com.

About Alcatraz East
Alcatraz East is the most arresting crime museum in the United States. Guests of all ages can encounter a unique journey into the history of American crime, crime solving, and our justice system. Through interactive exhibits and original artifacts, Alcatraz East is an entertaining and educational experience for all ages – so much fun it’s a crime! This family attraction is located at the entrance of The Island, located at 2757 Parkway, Pigeon Forge, TN. General admission tickets are $14.95 for children, $24.95 for adults. Group ticket sales are available. The museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., with the last ticket sold 60 minutes before closing. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit: alcatrazeast.com.

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Origami-Inspired Personal Shelter Provides A Quick Solution For Homeless

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Tina Hovsepian didn’t just want to get an “A” on her class project — she wanted to change people’s lives, too.

The architect is the inventor of Cardborigami — the collapsable, transportable and origami-inspired personal shelter she started inventing as a University of Southern California student in 2007. What started as Hovsepian’s academic assignment has become a feasible way to alleviate homelessness in her hometown of Los Angeles.

Hovsepian — who is currently raising funds to expand her product onto the streets of L.A. — was honored at a Women in the World event on March 18 for the design, and was awarded the Toyota Driving Solutions grant of $50,000 to further her work helping the homeless.

As she explained at the event, Hovsepian was moved to advocate for those in need after studying abroad in Cambodia, where her program helped redesign an impoverished school.

“It was… the first time witnessing firsthand third world poverty, and it got me really thinking about how privileged I am to be able to live in America, in Los Angeles, have an education, have supportive… people around me,” she said in a video produced by Women In The World, noting homelessness on Skid Row “is worse than [in] any third world country,” because the U.S. has the resources to do something about it.

Hovsepian is the founder and executive director of Cardborigami, the nonprofit, which is aiming to use the product as a way to secure permanent, long-term housing for those who need it.

The organization developed a four-step path out of homelessness, according to Hovsepian. First and foremost, Cardborigami will prioritize providing immediate shelter — such as its product — to those who need it. Secondly, the nonprofit will work with partner organizations that can provide social services to clients.

Securing permanent housing and then sustaining that housing through job placement are the third and final steps in the group’s model.

Continue onto HuffingtonPost to read the complete article.

STEM Education Gets Stamp of Approval From U.S. Government With New Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Forever Stamps

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How do you keep snail mail cutting-edge in the 21st century? One way: a new set of STEM postage stamps.

The U.S. government is acknowledging the value of STEM education to the nation’s standing in the world with four Forever first-class stamps that pay tribute to the study of science, technology, engineering, and math.

The Postal Service is officially rolling out the commemorative stamps this morning in a ceremony at the USA Science & Engineering Festival in Washington, according to Linn’s Stamp News.

“In an increasingly competitive world, proficiency in the STEM fields is more critical than ever,” the Postal Service said in announcing the stamps’ release. “Concerned about government studies that project a lack of qualified citizens to fill STEM jobs in the years ahead, a coalition of federal agencies, private businesses, nonprofit organizations, and educators has called for improving and expanding education in these fields.”

Each of the four 50-cent stamps, to be sold in panes of 20, features a collage with graphics germane to the subjects in the STEM acronym, superimposed on the profile of a young person. The montages “represent the complexity and interconnectedness of the STEM disciplines,” the Postal Service says.

Continue onto The 74Million to read the complete article.

Power Up: Computing Student Publishes Hand-Drawn Game on Google Play

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women in stem

Prior to taking the game modification development course taught by University Lecturer D.J. Kehoe last spring, computer science major Angela Vitaletti ’18 had never developed or programmed a videogame before.

“I would always bite off more than I could chew, and never finish,” said Vitaletti, who is from Middlesex and transferred to NJIT from Northampton Community College in Pennsylvania. “I took game mod as a way to motivate myself because it has real deadlines and projects that D.J. helps make achievable.”

To guide the learning process and create a culture of accountability, Vitaletti worked side-by-side with Kehoe to determine her individual project deliverables.

“We feel that this approach is a good analogue for working in industry and gives students a sense of ownership of the work that they do,” said Kehoe, who graduated from NJIT in 2009 with an M.S. in computer science. “It’s nice to give students portfolio-building projects that they can feel proud to show off.”

Upon completion of the course, not only was Vitaletti armed with work samples for her portfolio, she managed to publish a game on Google Play.

It’s called Doodle Doo, a digitally hand-drawn mobile game that puts players’ short-term memory to the test. The scribbles that live inside students’ notebooks inspired the concept. Offering four levels of difficulty, Doodle Doo personifies the youthful joy and reckless fun of high school, where wacky hijinks and tomfoolery abound.

Level one requires you to memorize which students hurled paper balls behind a teacher’s back before the pesky pupils scatter back to their seats, while level four transports you to a gymnasium during a power outage. When the lights come on, you must remember and identify what has disappeared from the space.

“The scenarios are ridiculous, but a lot of fun,” said Vitaletti, who drew the entire game by hand, down to the font. And while she’s ear-to-ear smiles now, the journey to complete Doodle Doo was often challenging.

“I spent nearly every single day developing the game,” she recalled. “I would spend hours trying to work out what seemed like a simple problem. There were a lot of times I wanted to give up. But I didn’t. I kept going.”

This display of perseverance, along with salable skills, project management experience and a strong work ethic, is exactly what Kehoe wants the students to take away from the course.

“The game development projects are substantial and daunting,” he admitted. “But after getting through them, our students can face a large project and complete it.”

Continue onto the New Jersey Institute of Technology Newsroom to read the complete article.

Apple Proposes Adding Disability-Inclusive Emojis to the Unicode Consortium

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Emojis of people using wheelchairs, service dogs, hearing aids and more could be coming to your iPhone. On Friday, Apple submitted a proposal to the Unicode Consortium — the non-profit that reviews requests for new emojis.

Apple’s request includes a total of 13 new emojis. The emojis fall into four categories, deaf and hard of hearing, blind and low vision, physical disabilities, and hidden disabilities, according to the company’s proposal. Apple collaborated with the American Council of the Blind, the Cerebral Palsy Foundation and the National Association of the Deaf.

“The current selection of emoji provides a wide array of representations of people, activities, and objects meaningful to the general public, but very few speak to the life experiences of those with disabilities,” Apple states in its proposal. “At Apple, we believe that technology should be accessible to everyone and should provide an experience that serves individual needs. Adding emoji emblematic to users’ life experiences helps foster a diverse culture that is inclusive of disability.”

Apple is not the first to call for disability-inclusive emojis. People with disabilities have been asking for more inclusive emojis for years. In 2016, Scope, a U.K.-based nonprofit which promotes inclusion for people with disabilities, released 18 emojis featuring disabled people and highlighting the Paralympics. None of these emojis, however, are part of the Unicode keyboard.

Currently, there is only one disability-related emoji — the “wheelchair symbol” — despite the fact that approximately 20 percent of the population lives with a disability. Fictional creatures, like mermaids and zombies, on the other hand, have 14 different emojis. According to Scope, of the 4,000 Twitter users they polled, 65 percent of users said one emoji wasn’t enough to represent the full spectrum of disability.

Continue onto The Mighty to read the complete article.