Student Recycles to Save Money for College

LinkedIn

Ryan Hickman earning the funds through his business, Ryan’s Recycling

Eight-year-old Ryan Hickman is an entrepreneur with a strong personality and a passion for recycling. He’s got years of experience, too—he’s been in the business since he was just three years old! To date, Hickman has saved more than $33,000 for his college education. Through his business, Ryan’s Recycling, Hickman has recycled an estimated 265,000 bottles and cans.

Every week for years, he and his family have sorted through bags of recyclables. As of mid-December 2016, he had earned $10K by recycling cans and bottles from his customers—friends, family, and neighbors. Once he reached that milestone, the mainstream media began to take notice. After first being mentioned on a website called One Green Planet, the story behind Ryan’s Recycling went viral. Since then, Ryan’s story has been seen by over 140 million people on social media channels.

Hickman has since been featured on just about every major news station in the United States and several around the world. He appeared on The Ellen DeGeneres Show, where he was presented with a check for $10,000, as well as a battery-operated vehicle to use in his work. His story has run in various newspapers, including USA TODAY and the Orange County Register, as well as on ABC World News and other social and mainstream media sites.

His father Damion says Ryan got started recycling when he took him along to a local rePlanet, the largest recycling collection network in the country. At just 3-1/2 years old, Damion says Ryan “really enjoyed going, and I gave him the money from the plastic bottles.” He says it didn’t take long for Ryan to connect the dots: recycled bottles and cans = money. “He asked all our neighbors to start saving for him. He then enlisted people in his grandparents’ neighborhood, and it just grew from there.”

Hickman has regular customers that call every month for a local pickup, and friends and family drop off regularly. Every three weeks, his biggest customer, El Niguel Country Club, fills up the family truck with cans and bottles. Ryan and his dad take it all home and begin sorting the glass, plastic and aluminum cans. “Everything is bagged up, and then we head off to the recycle center,” says Damion. “A typical trip for us takes about an hour, and Ryan usually makes around $200+ each trip.”

Damion reports that Ryan is involved in every step of his business, from collecting the cans and bottles from his customers to picking up the bags and gloves to do the work. “He even handles depositing his money in the bank, where they all know him as Ryan, the president of Ryan’s Recycling.” Early last year, Hickman sold T-shirts to friends, family, and customers and donated the profits to the Pacific Marine Mammal Center in Laguna Beach, California, where he serves as a junior ambassador. Ryan has donated over $5000 to their efforts.

Ryan continues to recycle and educate others through interview appearances. His father reports that he’s recently begun preparing his parents for the day that he’ll need to buy himself a real trash truck.

“I’m not sure where he plans to park it,” says Damion, “but I have a feeling I would lose my spot in the driveway!”

Ryan has received thousands of emails around the world with people that have been inspired to start recycling after seeing his story.

Recently Ryan started a new ten week recycling campaign to try to get everyone around the world involved with recycling 300,000 cans and bottles.  Follow Ryan below to catch weekly videos with updates and announcing new corporate involvement:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ryans_recycling/status/949807967733452800

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fEMYY5SlyV8&feature=share

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ryansrecycling/videos/773804682828029/

How Deja Baker overcame long odds and finally landed her dream job

LinkedIn

Her title may be unremarkable—software engineer at a Chicago trading firm—but the journey she took to land it is a triumph that doesn’t fit neatly on a resume.

The phone call that ended the military career of Midshipman Deja Baker came on a rainy morning in Hawaii in late May 2017. Having recently completed her third year at the U.S. Naval Academy, Baker was on leave, one week into a month of R&R—hiking, beachcombing, and Netflix-bingeing at her fiancé’s apartment in Oahu. The voice on the phone was her company officer’s. He told her she was to return to Annapolis immediately and pack up her things. Her time at the academy was over.

“It put me in panic mode,” she says.

That spring, a mysterious bruise on her leg had prompted Baker to visit the doctor, a decision that tipped one unlucky domino after the next: The doctor ordered blood tests; the results were alarming, and he hospitalized her; after a five-day stay, she received a diagnosis of a rare blood condition she chooses not to reveal. Simply put, her blood didn’t clot right. The U.S. Navy insists that its officers bleed properly. So, even though she had already served a tour in Japan as an enlisted sailor, had completed advanced training in cryptologic intelligence, was one year from completing a computer science degree, and was aiming to work in the information warfare command far removed from battle, she was out. She had no job prospects, no cash, and as soon as she packed up her things back on the mainland, no home.

“For the next 24 hours, I just bawled,” she says.

By the next morning, however, Baker had regrouped. Having persuaded her company officer to let her finish the remaining three weeks of her leave, she spent that time researching coding boot camps she could apply to.

Recruiters and industrial psychologists stress the importance of attributes such as resilience and determination (a recent survey by LinkedIn identified four soft skills most coveted by companies—leadership, communication, collaboration, and time management), and employers are devising new methods to assess these kinds of intangible qualities, but the relentless drive Baker possesses can be hard to spot on a résumé. She doesn’t present as tough. She’s soft-spoken and doesn’t like talking about herself. She dresses in startup-employee casual—cropped jeans, Toms shoes, and hoodie. At 27, she still gets carded whenever she orders a beer. Baker’s most valuable talents, the formidable inner strength and insatiable curiosity she’s exhibited since she was a child, are traits that might only emerge over the course of the kind of probing face-to-face interview with a perceptive manager that seems to happen less and less often in this era of job application portals and chatbots. Does an algorithm yet exist that will discern the extent of Deja Baker’s tenacity?

Continue onto Fast Company to read the complete article.

Google Doodle Celebrates Mary G. Ross. Here’s What to Know About the First Native American Woman Engineer

LinkedIn

Today’s Google Doodle celebrates the 110th birthday of Mary G. Ross, the first Native American woman engineer. Over the course of her five-decade career, Ross achieved many firsts and made major contributions to the aerospace industry.

Here’s what to know about the trailblazer, born on Aug. 9, 1908, who opened the doors for future female engineers in the field.

Who Was Mary G. Ross?

Great-great granddaughter to Chief John Ross of the Cherokee Nation, Mary G. Ross was born in the small town of Park Hill in Oklahoma. Raised with the Cherokee value of learning, Ross pursued a path considered nontraditional for women. After receiving a degree in math from Northeastern State College, Ross taught math and science until she returned to school to earn her master’s in math from Colorado State College of Education.

What were her contributions to aerospace?

In 1942, Lockheed Missiles and Space Company hired Ross as mathematician. But after a manager recognized her talent, Ross was sent to UCLA to earn a classification in aeronautical engineering. Lockheed then rehired her as their first female engineer. Ross would go on to work on major projects such as the Agena rocket, which was a crucial step in the Apollo program to land on the moon. She also was a part of SkunkWorks, a top-secret 40-member think tank where she was the only women aside from the secretary. Ross’ work there involved developing initial design concepts for interplanetary space travel, including flyby missions to Venus and Mars.
“Often at night there were four of us working until 11 p.m.,” she once said according to Google. “I was the pencil pusher, doing a lot of research. My state of the art tools were a slide rule and a Frieden computer. We were taking the theoretical and making it real.”

How did she open the door for women?

Ross also devoted herself to encouraging women and Native Americans into careers in the field of STEM. She was a fellow of the Society of Women Engineers, where she established a scholarship in her name to support future female engineers and technologists. To support fellow Native Americans, Ross also worked closely with the American Indian Science and Engineering Society and the Council of Energy Resource Tribes to develop their educational programs.

Continue onto TIME to read the complete article.

24 Companies Hiring Like Crazy in August

LinkedIn
diverse group of people at work in office meeting

The U.S. has approximately 6 million open jobs right now. That amounts to 6 million opportunities for you to land your dream job. Companies are desperate for top talent and are offering everything from free transportation to signing bonuses and even extra vacation days just to get your attention.

Here are a handful of hot companies hiring like crazy this month. Don’t let another day pass in a sub-par job. Embrace a new challenge and apply for a new job today!

What Some Employees Are Saying About Companies: “Innovative, fast-paced company that works hard to make the patient and employee experience a positive one.”

Booking.com

Where Hiring: Seattle, WA; New York, NY; Grand Rapids, MI; Los Angeles, CA & more.
What Roles: Site Reliability Engineer, Customer Service Guest Executive, Regional Recruitment Manager, Credit Controller, Marketing Manager, Account Manager, HR Business Partner, Freelance Photographer, Payroll Specialist & more.
What Employees Say: “Very good conditions, competitive salary, good bonus structure, insurance, healthcare etc.” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

Qualtrics

Where Hiring: Palo Alto, CA; Provo, UT; Dallas, TX; Seattle, WA & more.
What Roles: Content Marketing Manager, Senior Sales Engineer, Growth Leader, Email Marketing Manager, Senior DevOps Engineer, Customer Success Associate, Executive Assistant, Sales Training and Enablement, Product Specialist & more.
What Employees Say: “Free lunch practically every day, snacks everywhere, soft serve ice cream, and cookies on Fridays. Scooters, comfy couches, massage chairs, walking desks, and acres of beautiful gardens with strong WiFi to get work done in the shade of a tree. The benefits are unreal – 100% of health insurance premiums paid, 3% 401k contributions (even if you contribute $0), $2,500 a year into your HSA, 2 weeks of paternity leave, and $1,500 towards a vacation experience (on top of PTO).” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

BounceX

Where Hiring: New York, NY
What Roles: Director of Customer Success, Software Engineer, Technical Recruiter, Senior Product Manager, Senior Data Scientist, Client Partnerships Manager, Manager of Revenue & more.
What Employees Say: “Exciting time in the growth stage, considering we’re gearing up for IPO and working out the kinks related to scaling.” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

Lyft

Where Hiring: San Francisco, CA; Nashville, TN; New York, NY; Denver, CO; Chicago, IL & more
What Roles: Operations Manager, Customer Insights Analyst, Software Engineer, Data Scientist, Fleet Coordinator, Accountant, Product Marketing Manager, Embedded Software Lead, Technical Program Manager, Chief of Staff to the COO, Vehicle Engineer & more.
What Employees Say: “Employees value one another and work together as one team to accomplish goals and drive results as we support our internal and external customers. Work/life balance, great benefits, empowering culture, innovative and creative co-workers working alongside you – and the ability to truly partner to create and influence and leave your mark – just to name a few!” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

McGrath RentCorp

Where Hiring: Pasadena, TX; Livermore, CA; Charlotte, NC; Stockton, CA; Baltimore, MD; Dallas, TX; Auburndale, FL; South Plainfield, NJ & more.
What Roles: Class A Truck Driver, Purchasing Assistant, General Construction, Plumber, Manager of Accounting, Quality Control Inspector, Commercial Collections & more.
What Employees Say: “Great people, amazing culture, financially sound, opportunities to grow for those that want more.” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

ProHEALTH Care

Where Hiring: Great Neck, NY; Lake Success, NY; Mineola, NY & more.
What Roles: Office Manager, Urgent Care Medical Assistant, Receptionist, Nurse Practitioner, IT Manager, Regional Manager, Scheduler, Otolaryngologist, Optometrist & more.
What Employees Say: “Innovative, fast-paced company that works hard to make the patient and employee experience a positive one. A lot of opportunity and growth potential for staff. Significant company resources allow me and my staff to excel.” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

AppDynamics

Where Hiring: San Francisco, CA; Dallas, TX; Bengaluru, India; Sydney, Australia; Bracknell, England & more
What Roles: Product Manager, Customer Success Engineer, Staff Software Engineer, Senior Software Engineer, Enterprise Sales Representatives, Sales Engineers, Senior Product Marketing Manager, Senior Manager – Global Sales Compensation Operations & more.
What Employees Say: “AppDynamics is one of the fastest growing software companies of all time and is set to fly by its competitors in terms of revenue this year.” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

Milwaukee Tool

Where Hiring: Brookfield, WI; Greenwood, MS; Olive Branch, MS; Jackson, MS & more.
What Roles: Key Account Manager, Shipping Coordinator, General Labor, Team Lead, Network Engineer, Senior Project Engineer, DC Auditor, Demand Planner, Supply Planner, Human Resources Manager, Material Handler & more.
What Employees Say: “It is a fast-paced environment filled with a lot of young and talented people. The company has a positive long-term outlook and has continued to grow at a ridiculous pace offering new opportunities constantly.” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

LogMeIn

Where Hiring: Boston, MA; Orem, UT; Raleigh, NC; Tempe, AZ & more.
What Roles: Business Systems Analyst, Account Manager, Support Specialist, Inside Sales Representative, Resolutions Representative, Shipping & Receiving Clerk, Lead UX Designer, Staff Accountant & more.
What Employees Say: “LogMeIn is on an incredible journey. Each quarter the bar is raised and the growth and innovation continues to accelerate. Employees of all levels have plenty of opportunities to grow their skills and career. Bill Wagner is a world-class CEO and is focused and fearless.” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

WOW! Internet Cable and Phone

Where Hiring: Denver, CO; Tampa, FL; Knoxville, TN; Cleveland, OH; Augusta, GA & more.
What Roles: VP of Commercial Product, Business Operations Support Analyst, System Technician, Cable Installer, Billing Systems Analyst, Enterprise Account Executive, Residential Sales Consultant & more.
What Employees Say: “Strong culture founded on people serving people, inside and outside of the company.” —Former Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

Calm

Where Hiring: San Francisco, CA
What Roles: Data Analyst, Data Scientist, DevOps Engineer, Front-end Engineer, Mobile Engineer – iOS, Mobile Engineer – Android, Software Engineer – Data, Software Engineer – API, Head of Talent Acquisition, Director of Influencer Marketing, Head of Calm for Teams & more.
What Employees Say: “Great culture, mission-driven, incredibly successful, growing fast & perfect location.” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

Aegis Living

Where Hiring: Bellevue, WA; Pleasant Hill, CA; Seattle, WA; Redmond, WA; San Rafael, CA & more.
What Roles: Concierge, Driver, Wellness Nurse, Cook, Life Enrichment Assistant, Caregiver, Activities Assistant, Housekeeper, Bilingual Caregiver, Sales Director, Director of Operations & more.
What Employees Say: “I finally have a job where loving people is okay.” I have never felt so empowered and supported as I do at Aegis.” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

Glassdoor

Where Hiring: San Francisco, CA; London; Dublin; Mill Valley, CA; Chicago, IL & more.
What Roles: Customer Success Manager, Product Manager, Senior Enterprise Account Executive, Senior Manager of Engineering, HR Partner, Senior Java Engineer, Lead Product Growth Manager, Accounts Payable Specialist, Director of Jobs Product, Senior Product Designer & more.
What Employees Say: “We’ve been through a lot of changes in the last 12-14 months, but it finally feels like we’re getting into a groove. Our fearless leader has worked hard to make CS a great place to work throughout the company. He sets clear goals and executes.” —Current Employee

SEE OPEN JOBS

Continue on to Glassdoor.com for the complete list

Marie Tharp, The Woman Who Discovered The Backbone Of Earth

LinkedIn

Marie Tharp was born July 30, 1920, in Ypsilanti, Michigan. Already in early years she followed her father, a soil surveyor for the United States Department of Agriculture, into the field. However she also loved to read and wanted to study literature at St. John’s College in Annapolis, but at the time women were not admitted there. So she went to Ohio University, where she graduated in 1943. The Second World War changed dramatically the situation. The United States needed a replacement for the men who went into war and women were now encouraged to obtain degrees also in ‘manly’ disciplines, like science and technology. Marie enrolled in a petroleum geology program, becoming so one of the first ‘Petroleum Geology Girls’ when she graduated in 1944. She worked for a short time in the petroleum industry, but found the work unrewarding and decided to resume her studies at Tulsa University. In 1948 she graduated in mathematics and found work at the Lamont Geological Laboratory of the Columbia University. As the Cold War between the United States and the Sowjet Union got hotter, the U.S. Navy was interested in a map of the seafloor, believed to be of strategic relevance for future battles with submarines. Marie started a prolific collaboration with geologist Bruce Charles Heezen (1924 -1977), specialist for seismic and topographic data obtained from the seafloor. As women, Marie was not allowed on board of the research vessel. Instead, she interpreted and visualized the obtained data, producing large hand-drawn maps of the seafloor. She co-authored with Heezen a book and various papers on their research.

Between 1959 until the death of Heezen in 1977 she continued to work on various large-scale maps that would depict the still unknown topography of the entire seafloor. The results were astounding. The following original sketch by Tharp and Heezen of the topography of the Mid-Atlantic shows in green and yellow a mountain range located between the coasts of Africa and America. The preliminary map shows also a series of parallel transform-faults cutting through the mountain range. Based on such sketches Tharp and Heezen published in 1977 the famous World Ocean Floor Map.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

How Shavone Charles Created Her Dream Job In Tech

LinkedIn

Shavone Charles holds many titles. From being a musician and artist to her role as Head of Global Music and Youth Culture Communications at Instagram and recent founder of a passion project, Magic in Her Melanin, Charles is undoubtedly known to her peers and the surrounding tech and entertainment industries as being a renaissance woman and connoisseur of culture.

The term, “Do It For The Culture”, according to the Urban Dictionary, is a statement requesting that someone carry out a specific action for benefit of their shared culture. Charles is doing just that with not only her work in Silicon Valley but for black creatives globally. With her deep Trinidadian roots, Charles is passionate about maintaining her self-identity while creating an environment of inclusivity for women of color in tech.

Before she was trailblazing a new path for future generations, millennials and black women in tech, or creating her own job title at multi-billion dollar companies like Twitter and Instagram, she was a San Diego native and first-generation college graduate from UC Merced, just trying to figure it out. Upon graduating in 2012, Charles snagged several high-profile entertainment and communications based internships at Google, BET Networks, Capitol Hill and The Department of Justice. Her big break happened when she was the presented with the opportunity to create her own role and title at Twitter.

At Twitter, Shavone established her niche career focus on culture-focused communications and social marketing, business partnerships and data analysis with a close lens on music, online communities and youth culture. Upon joining the Twitter team, Shavone created her own role, as the first person to join her team and head up the company’s global music and culture communications, with a focus on data, often working on efforts tied music partnerships and high-priority product launches and acquisitions (including Vine and Periscope). During her time at Twitter, Shavone also remotely oversaw all of the company’s communications efforts for Brazil and Canada out of San Francisco and employed a number of successful global culture-driven communications programs tied to major entertainment and consumer moments in market (including Rock In Rio, Brazil’s Fashion Week, Juno Awards and more). She led content management and curation for the official @TwitterMusic account and helped grow it by over 5 million followers, as result of social campaigns with talent and highlighting the best uses of Twitter and Vine in music.

In addition to launching PR and social campaigns, Charles had the unique opportunity to create the first-ever employee resource group for African-American employees, aptly named Twitter BlackBirds. Her role at Twitter, catapulted her into a new realm of visibility and influence, leading her to head up communications and culture at Instagram. Charles has always been intrigued by the notion of connecting diverse groups of people through social media and cultivating an accepting community for people to have the choice to share commonalities.

Technology has allowed the culture to be seen on a global scale, with creatives now at the forefront of the movement and art form. It’s not a “niche” community anymore and people are using the internet to build a community around their interests,” which she said at Forbes I.D.E.A Summit.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

This Coder Wants You to Ignore the Techie Stereotypes

LinkedIn

What is one thing Camilo Hurtado wants people to know? Coders are more than a stereotype. Picturing someone sitting in their cube, scowling at their screen and tapping furiously at the keyboard? Or perhaps surrounded by empty soda cans and pizza boxes, clad in oversize headphones? This couldn’t be further from the truth, Hurtado says. “The job is highly collaborative!” he adds. And, as long as we’re debunking myths, he says they’re not all trying to become billionaires before they hit age 25 either.

Hurtado, a young software engineer at JPMorgan Chase, is keen to set the record straight. He wants to fight off the social stigmas surrounding coders so more people know what an exciting and rewarding career it is. Technology, he believes, is the key to solving problems and improving lives. “The possibilities are endless,” he says. “Every day, people are inventing new technologies and coming up with new ways to use existing ones,” he adds, including ways to battle social issues.

Hurtado tells us how he began his career as a technologist, how the tech space is more diverse than meets the eye, and why this field has been so rewarding.

Did you always want to be a coder?

No, I wanted to be an archaeologist. I used to watch the Indiana Jones movies, and I thought traveling the world and having adventures while learning about other cultures would be a very fun job. But it turns out technology is an adventure too.

As I grew up, technology became the vehicle I used explore the world on a daily basis. I became interested in careers that allowed me to have an impact, while working with people from around the world. And although I wouldn’t call myself Indiana Jones, I do get the opportunity to solve complex global problems every day.

How did you get into coding?

I wanted a career where I would always be learning, and I saw that JPMorgan Chase had a great development program for college graduates—the Technology Analyst Program (TAP). I joined the company fresh from college, and, after graduating from TAP, I learned they offered lots of other programs to help technologists advance and grow. I liked how they seemed to understand how important it is to continually develop tech knowledge. I’ve been here seven years now and just recently completed the Expert Engineer development program, which is for high-performing technologists who want to keep moving up the ladder. The learning never stops!

You view technology as a force for good in this world. Why?

There is tremendous potential from the ideas coders create when they come together—anything from nonprofit cost reduction to life-saving innovations. That’s why I jumped at the opportunity to volunteer for one of JPMorgan Chase’s Code for Good coding challenges, where the company teams up with a nonprofit and poses a challenge to a group of students who are interested in pursuing tech jobs. The students, with help from mentors like me, have 24 hours to work together and come up with tech solutions to the nonprofit’s real-world problems. To date, the company has hosted 45 Code for Good challenges across 15 cities around the world.

Continue onto JP Morgan Chase Newsroom to read the complete article.

30-year-old Mareena Robinson Snowden is the first black woman to earn a PhD in nuclear engineering from MIT

LinkedIn

When Mareena Robinson Snowden walked across the commencement stage at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.) on June 8th, she became the first black woman to earn a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the storied university.

For her, there was one particular word that the experience brought to mind: grateful.

“Grateful for every part of this experience — highs and lows,” she wrote on Instagram. “Every person who supported me and those who didn’t. Grateful for a praying family, a husband who took on this challenge as his own, sisters who reminded me at every stage how powerful I am, friends who inspired me to fight harder. Grateful for the professors who fought for and against me. Every experience on this journey was necessary, and I’m better for it.”

Snowden’s Ph.D. was the culmination of 11 years of post-secondary study. But the 30-year-old tells CNBC Make It that a career in STEM wasn’t something she dreamed of as a child.

“Engineering definitely was not something I had a passion for at a young age,” she says. “I was quite the opposite. I think my earliest memories of math and science were definitely one of like nervousness and anxiety and just kind of an overall fear of the subject.”

She credits her high school math and physics teachers with helping to expand her interests beyond English and history, subjects she loved.

“I had this idea that I wasn’t good at math and they kind of helped to peel away that mindset,” she explains. “They showed me that it’s more of a growth situation, that you can develop an aptitude for this and you can develop a skill. It’s just like a muscle, and you have to work for it.”

When Snowden, who grew up in Miami, was in the 12th grade and studying physics, she and her dad were introduced to a friend of a friend who worked in the physics department at Florida A&M University. At the time, she says, she was considering colleges and decided to make a visit to the campus.

“We drove up there and it was amazing,” says Snowden. “They treated me like a football player who was getting recruited. They took me to the scholarship office, and they didn’t know anything about me at the time. All they knew was that I was a student who was open to the possibility of majoring in physics.”

Continue onto CNBC News to read the complete article.

This app wants to bring banking to the unbanked

LinkedIn

Growing up in Terry, Mississippi, Sheena Allen didn’t spend much time in banks.

The small town, located 17-miles south of Jackson, only had one bank branch (and still does). Much of the community got by without ever having accounts, including Allen’s grandmother and great grandmother. They relied on fee-heavy solutions like payday loans and check cashing services.

Allen, a 29-year-old app developer, hadn’t given much thought to the issues associated with not having a bank account until she came home for the holidays in 2015. She noticed how the people who still rely on non-traditional banking lose money on interest and fees for cashing checks, reloading prepaid cards, and borrowing and lending money. Without a bank account, they had difficulty establishing credit scores, buying homes, and saving for the future.

After years of living in a few large US cities, she unexpectedly found her biggest business idea back where she started.

In 2016, she started working on CapWay, an online banking and financial literacy app that aims to help the unbanked, underbanked and people living paycheck to paycheck.

“I know this problem from a personal point of view, from my family and friends, but I didn’t know this problem from outside of Mississippi,” said Allen, who spent a year traveling around the US researching the issue.

Users can connect existing accounts to the app or get a pre-paid card from CapWay, which Allen says will have a lower rate than most other cards currently available. It will make custom suggestions based on an individual’s spending habits, such as pointing them to a state-run program that can help renters become homeowners or telling them how to avoid overdraft fees. The ultimate goal is to change behavior and transition users to a proper bank account.

Although anyone can use the app, it is targeted toward Millennials who aren’t yet set in their ways to “stop them from going into a cycle that’s really hard to get out of,” she said.

CapWay is still in the testing phase. It will first roll out to iOS, Android and mobile web users in Mississippi, which has the highest population of unbanked and underbanked residents. When it launches nationally later this year, CapWay will partner with schools, employers, financial institutions and community organizations in the South to reach the people who need it.

Allen says the company will make money off paid partnerships, fees from pre-paid cards, and sponsored content and advertising.

Allen says CapWay is making sure its educational content easy to understand and tailored for its audience.

“In the end, education and understanding money along with giving them to tools to put that education to use will be the shift. You can’t give people one part and not the other and expect to see a big change,” said Allen.

Continue onto CNN to read the complete article.

Top 5 Highest Paying Government Jobs

LinkedIn
Woman Microbiologist

Government jobs offer stability, reasonably normal hours, many benefits and retirement packages. But, many people don’t realize that it offers are many high-paying jobs. See below for the top 5 jobs that pay a high salary.

1. Astronomer

Astronomy is a relatively small field, with about 6,000 professional astronomers in the United States. With a median annual salary of $108,681 a year, you can find them working for the Army, Air Force, and NASA.

2. Criminal Investigator

The projected growth rate for a criminal investigator is 18 percent. With an average base pay of $92,911 a year, criminal investigators work for the Department of Homeland Security, Department of Justice and the Army.

3. Microbiologist

Microbiologists earn an average of $87,500 a year, with an estimated increase of about 9 percent, and government agencies will be hiring about 8,000 new employees. Microbiologists can be found at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Agricultural Research Service, and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

4. Chaplain

This field is continuing to grow, and government chaplains earn an average $73,500 a year. You will find chaplains being hired at the Veterans Health Administration, Bureau of Prisons/Federal Prison System, Office Secretary Health and Human Services, and the National Institutes of Health.

5. Correctional Officer

Correctional officers on average make $47, 000 a year. A total of 26,000 new correctional officer jobs are expected to become available by 2020. Most of these are likely to be found at the Bureau of Prisons/Federal Prison System and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Most correctional officer jobs only require a high school diploma, but other employers, such as the U.S. Bureau of Prisons, require at least a bachelor’s degree.

Sources: glassdoor.com, financeandcareer.com, salary.com, federalpay.org

Stacy Brown-Philpot of TaskRabbit on Being a Black Woman in Silicon Valley

LinkedIn

The Detroit native studied at Penn and Stanford, worked for Goldman and Google, and now runs the gig economy pioneer that Ikea acquired in 2017.

Stacy Brown-Philpot didn’t grow up aspiring to be the chief executive of a technology company. Instead, she wanted to be an accountant.

While interning at an accounting firm in the 1990s, Ms. Brown-Philpot — who was raised by her mother in Detroit — worked for a partner who happened to be African-American. “I was like, ‘OK, there’s a black person who is a partner at this firm. This is something that I can accomplish.’”

But as Ms. Brown-Philpot acquired more experience and education, her ambitions grew, too. She graduated from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business in 1997, did a stint as an accountant at PricewaterhouseCoopers, then became an investment banker at Goldman Sachs in 1999.

She went back to college to get her graduate degree from Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business, then in 2003 joined Google, where Sheryl Sandberg became a mentor. At Google, Ms. Brown-Philpot assumed a series of leadership roles and founded the Black Googlers Network, an employee resource group.

After nine years at Google, she joined TaskRabbit — which lets people hire freelancers for odd jobs — as chief operating officer. She became chief executive in 2016, and last year, she sold the company to Ikea, the Swedish furniture giant.

This interview, which was condensed and edited for clarity, was conducted at TaskRabbit headquarters in San Francisco.

Tell me about your upbringing.

I grew up on the West Side of Detroit. My mom raised my brother and me by herself. We didn’t have a lot. My mother worked a job that didn’t pay a whole lot of money, so she had to make a lot of sacrifices. But she prioritized education. She would fall asleep helping us with our homework at night. She always taught us that no one can take your learning away from you. And with that, you can go anywhere and do anything.

So I focused on getting good grades. I wasn’t always a popular kid. I didn’t have the best clothes. But I was a smart kid. It’s cool to be smart in Silicon Valley. It’s not cool to be smart on the West Side of Detroit.

What was your first job?

I had a paper route with my brother. I would help him collect the money. I was like the C.F.O. of that operation, making sure we got paid.

And then you went to Penn.

I had no idea what an Ivy League school was. I was a fish out of water. My high school was 98 percent black. Penn was 6 percent black. So I had to find community. I had to figure out how was I going to succeed in this environment where most people don’t look like me, and don’t come from where I came from.

So where’d you find community?

There was a black college house. I didn’t live there. I would just go over there and spend time just sitting around with people that, you know, ate collard greens and fried chicken, just like I did growing up. It just made it safer for me and more confident for me to walk into a classroom and know I knew the answers and speak up.

Continue onto the New York Times to read the complete article.