Booz Allen Hamilton’s Problem Solvers Campaign Celebrates Women Of Color In STEM Careers

While the names and enormous accomplishments of Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan, and Mary Jackson were left out of history books, these brilliant African American women are now getting the recognition they deserve with the release of the blockbuster film “Hidden Figures” in 2016. Continue reading Booz Allen Hamilton’s Problem Solvers Campaign Celebrates Women Of Color In STEM Careers

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You can create your own augmented reality experiences with this app

2017 is the year tech will change the way we interact with the world around us. Augmented reality is the emerging tech that’s slowly disrupting our lives. Perhaps you spent a good chunk of last year running around after Pokemon IRL? Or sent a Snap of you with an adorable pair of dog ears to your nearest and dearest on Snapchat? Then you’ve experienced the power of augmented reality for yourself. And there’s an exciting British startup bringing AR to the palms of the people.

Zappar is the app that’s giving you the power of augmented reality via something you can’t live without – your smartphone.

What actually is AR?

Although the two are often mistaken, AR is something completely different from its so-called “cousin” virtual reality. Reality of the virtual kind aims to reconstruct reality itself – creating a world you can enter and explore. Augmented reality enhances the real world, layering information over what’s “real.” And augmented reality through Zappar is making it quick and easy to create your own “Zaps” – the company’s term for AR experiences.

Born in 2011 as the brainchild of four founders with a big ambition and some great technology, Zappar creates custom AR experiences for brands, and also gives the power over to you to create experiences for yourself. A feat of technology, Dr. Simon Taylor and Connell Gauld had already done the heavy lifting in terms of the algorithm and platform at the core of the Zappar proposition during their time at the University of Cambridge. CEO Caspar Thykier and Kirk Ewing came on board with their experience in business development, marketing and licensing, and so the app came to be. Today, Zappar has worked with some of the world’s biggest names, creating immersive experiences with huge global reach.

At just six years old, Zappar is still a relatively new business. However, CEO and co-founder Caspar Thykier told Mashable that “AR years are a lot like dog years, so in fact we’re practically part of the furniture in our field!” There’s a vibrant future ahead for companies at the forefront of the tech.

Having built their fully-owned tech-stack from the ground up, the team is constantly pioneering and pushing what’s possible in the field of reality both augmented and virtual for the mass market – keeping their proposition young and fresh. Thykier lamented that “the market is really coming towards us in terms of the development of better hardware, better cameras, processors and batteries all at more affordable prices across the world” – giving a glimpse of what the future of this tech could hold. The team is ready for the future too:  “As a software-as-a-service platform, we’ve built scalability into our proposition, ready for the next generation of developers who are beginning to experiment with this new creative canvas.”

Continue onto Mashable to read more about this creative app.

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Stevon Cook went from public housing to empowering public schools through tech training

There are roughly 22,000 tech companies in San Francisco, yet most local high school students have never set foot in one. Most don’t even know what a “startup” or a “venture capitalist” is.

Stevon Cook, a former resident of San Francisco’s public housing system, is changing that through his work as chief executive of Mission Bit and his work as a commissioner on the Board of Education for the City of San Francisco.

Cook grew up at a time when Thurgood Marshall High School in San Francisco’s Bayview-Hunters’ Point was known as a school that had developed a reputation for sending low-income students to college.

When Cook was looking at high schools, he got assigned to a dropout factory, but he was determined to get into Thurgood. Every student at Thurgood received a laptop and the message they sent was that a laptop was a key to getting into college.

Continue onto TechCrunch to read the complete article.

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